Historic Pelham

Presenting the rich history of Pelham, NY in Westchester County: current historical research, descriptions of how to research Pelham history online and genealogy discussions of Pelham families.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Important New Scholarship on the Men to Whom Thomas Pell Sold Part of the Manor of Pelham in 1654


During the last few years a great deal of additional research has been devoted to understanding the lives of the men who interacted with Pelham Founder Thomas Pell at about the time he acquired the lands that later became the Manor of Pelham from local Native Americans on June 27, 1654.  For example, in 2009 I authored an article detailing what we know of the lives of the five Englishmen who signed Thomas Pell's so-called "Indian deed" as witnesses:  John "Ffinch," Richard Crabb, Henry Ackerly, William Newman, and Thomas Lawrence.  See Bell, Blake A., The New Englanders Who Signed Thomas Pell's 1654 Agreement Acquiring Much of Today's Bronx and Lower Westchester Counties From Native Americans, The Bronx County Historical Society Journal, Vol. XLVI, Nos. 1 & 2, pp. 25-49 (Spring / Fall, 2009).

There now is important new scholarship regarding the New Englanders to whom Thomas Pell sold part of the Manor of Pelham in 1654 to enable the founding of "West Chester," an English settlement on lands claimed by the Dutch located where today's Westchester Square in the Bronx now stands.  Rebecca I. M. Walch has authored an article identifying, with certainty, the sixteen settlers of West Chester who petitioned Dutch authorities on March 16, 1656 to permit them to remain in the settlement (and submit to Dutch control) after the Dutch had moved to evict them and imprison many.  See Walch, Rebecca I. M., The Westchester Petitioners of 1656, National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 106, No. 1, pp. 61-77 (March 2018) (Note:  membership in organization required to access via this link).  

Historical Context

In the mid-17th century, New England settlers pushed southwestward toward New Netherland. The Director-General of New Netherland, Pieter Stuyvesant, wanted to clarify a firm boundary between New Netherland and New England. In 1650 he negotiated with English colonial authorities the so-called “Treaty of Hartford.” That Treaty recognized a boundary that began near today’s Greenwich, Connecticut, crossed Long Island Sound and split Long Island west of today’s Oyster Bay. Lands west of the line were deemed under Dutch control. Lands east were deemed under English control. 

Though the Treaty seemed to favor the English, some in New England were unhappy. They wanted the boundary established westward to permit English control of portions of today’s Westchester and Bronx Counties. 

Additionally, in 1653 and early 1654, only months before Pell’s purchase, the Commonwealth of England and the United Provinces of the Netherlands were at war. Although they fought the “First Anglo-Dutch War” entirely at sea, English and Dutch settlers feared fighting would spread to the North American colonies at any time. Only days before Pell’s purchase, Dutch and English colonists were unaware that the Treaty of Westminster had been signed in Europe on April 5, 1654, ending the war. Amidst all this, Pell negotiated his acquisition of Native American lands claimed by the Dutch – a dangerously provocative act clearly designed to support the English cause and to defy the Dutch.

Only months after acquiring the lands, Thomas Pell engaged in an even more provocative act that further angered the Dutch.  He planted a tiny settlement on a portion of the land that came to be known as "West Chester."  The settlement seems to have been started at least as early as October, 1654.  See Gehring, Charles T., Editor, New York Historical Manuscripts:  Dutch Volume V Council Minutes, 1652-1654, pp. 193-94 (Baltimore, MD:  Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983) (Click on link at bottom of the Web page to access PDF of the entire book; reference is to Oct. 26, 1654 letter from Peter Stuyvesant to "Honorable, Discreet and Very Esteemed Gentlemen").  On November 5, 1654, Dutch authorities adopted a resolution ordering the fiscal (a police authority) to "forbid certain Englishmen settling at Vreedlandt" (i.e., the area that included West Chester).  There are strong suggestions in 17th century documentation relating to the matter, however, that only a few days later Thomas Pell formally sold the lands to some of the settlers on November 14, 1654.  See generally Mon., Nov. 06, 2006:  The Source of Confusion Over the Date Thomas Pell Acquired the Lands That Became the Manor of Pelham.



November 5, 1654 Resolution in Dutch "ordering the fiscal to forbid
certain Englishment settling at Vreedlandt."  Note that the Document
is Burned Around the Edges from the Great New York State Capitol
Fire of March 29, 1911.  Source:  New York State Archives, "Resolution
(Westchester County)" (visited Apr. 22, 2018).  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

The tiny settlement of West Chester (so named by the English because it stood at the western end of English territory) stood near today's Westchester Square in The Bronx.  In about November of 1654, fewer than two dozen English settlers including men and women lived in that area.  Dutch authorities insisted they previously had acquired the same lands from other Native Americans in 1640. For a more complete understanding of the circumstances surrounding the competing Dutch and Pell purchases and the early days of the settlement at West Chester, see, e.g.:

Mon., Aug. 17, 2015:  Buyer's Remorse: After Thomas Pell Bought Pelham From Native Americans, He Wanted His Money Back! 

Wed., Aug. 12, 2015:  Significant Research on the First "Indian Deed" Reflecting the Dutch Purchase of Lands that Included Today's Pelham

Tue., Sep. 02, 2014:  More Research on the First "Indian Deed" Reflecting the Dutch Purchase of Lands that Included Today's Pelham.

Tue., Mar. 18, 2014:  The First "Indian Deed" Reflecting a Sale by Native Americans of Lands that Became Pelham

Tue., Nov. 06, 2007:  Is This Another Dead End in the Search for the Text of an Indian Deed to Lands That Included Today's Pelham Sold to the Dutch? 

Mon., Oct. 22, 2007:  Dutch Authorities Demand That Thomas Pell Halt His "Intrusion" at Westchester in 1656.

Tue., Dec. 5, 2006:  Where is Evidence of the 1640 Dutch Purchase from Native Americans of the Lands That Became Pelham? 

Mon., Nov. 06, 2006:  The Source of Confusion Over the Date Thomas Pell Acquired the Lands That Became the Manor of Pelham.

Mon., Dec. 26, 2005:  The Dutch Acquired Lands Including Pelham From Local Native Americans in 1640

On April 19, 1655, Dutch Province Fiscal Cornelis van Tienhoven issued a formal protest "To you, Thomas Pell, or whom else it may concern" warning that the settlers at West Chester had settled on lands that belonged to New Netherland by virtue of "title deeds" obtained by former Director General Willem Kieft. The protest further warned the settlers that they were subject to prosecution for their actions. When a group of Dutch men attempted to deliver and read the official Dutch protest, armed West Chester settlers stopped them and told them that they would remain in the settlement as English settlers until an official determination of the boundary between New England and New Netherland. 



April 19, 1655 "Order to the court messenger to serve the protest against
Thomas Pell"  Note, Once Again, the Burned Edges from the Great New
York State Capitol Fire of March 29, 1911.  Source:  New York State Archives,
(visited Apr. 22, 2018).  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

Apparently fed up that the English settlers at Westchester ignored their warnings and protests, on March 6, 1656, the Director General and Council of New Netherland ordered Captain Frederic de Coninck and Lieutenant Brian Nuton [i.e., Brian Newton] to lead a group of soldiers to West Chester to arrest most of the male settlers and to demolish all but three or four of the structures (leaving some buildings to store personal goods until the remaining women and children could depart). Within days the Dutch soldiers overran the tiny little settlement and took leading male settlers prisoners. They took the prisoners to a prison ship named the "De Waagh" anchored off the shores of Fort Amsterdam. 

After the women of the settlement petitioned and begged the Dutch authorities for release of their husbands, fathers, and sons, the Dutch agreed to release the imprisoned English settlers if they would leave New Netherland or take oaths of allegiance and submit to the rule of the Dutch authorities in New Netherland. Virtually all of the settlers chose the latter alternative and, on March 16, 1656 (Gregorian Calendar), many of the settlers petitioned the Dutch authorities to allow them to submit to Dutch rule and re-settle on their lands in Westchester. The petition was granted. The Dutch immediately renamed the settlement "Oostdorp" which means "East Town" because the Dutch viewed the settlement as located at the eastern edge of New Netherland.

Recent Scholarship

It is this March 16, 1656 petition by many of the settlers of West Chester to remain in the settlement under Dutch control that is the subject of the newly published article by Rebecca I. M. Walch.  In her excellent article, Ms. Walch details the events that led up to the petition and notes that 19th and 20th century published translations of the petition written in Dutch differed in several respects regarding those who signed (or whose names appeared on) the petition.  

Ms. Walch resolves these discrepancies by revealing that the New York State Archives recently digitized and posted online a handwritten copy of the petition that was transcribed into the Dutch colonial council minutes.  The pertinent transcription appears within an entry designated at its beginning as the "Commission of Thomas Wheeler to be chief magistrate of Westchester (Vreedland)."  Vreedland (or, Vreedlandt) is a Dutch reference to the area within which the settlement of West Chester was founded.  It means "Freedom Land."

Ms. Walch analyzes the names of the petitioners at the foot of the page copied by a Dutch clerk into the Council Minutes in 1656.  She then addresses the discrepancies among the various 19th and 20th century lists of the petitioners' names published in various books and resolves the matter by listing the following sixteen petitioners as among the earliest settlers at West Chester, founded by Thomas Pell in 1654:  Thomas Newman, Thomas Wheeler, Robert Bassett, Josiah Gilbert, John Rose, Robert Rose, Dermod (Jeremiah) Canniff, Nickles / Nicholas Baly / Bayley, William Benfield, John Genner / Jenner, Robert Meaker, Obadiah Gilbert, John Brundish / Brundage, Edwards / Edward Waters, Samuel Barrett, and William Ward.  For each, she summarizes what is known about their lives noting, in conclusion, that "With the identities of the petitioners now clarified, a deeper study of this historic event is possible."



March 16, 1656 "Petition of Thomas Wheeler and 15 other settlers of Westchester
submitting themselves to the government of New Netherland and asking certain
privileges"  Source:  New York State Archives, "Petition of Thomas Wheeler and
Netherland and asking certain privileges" (visited Apr. 22, 2018).  NOTE:  Click on
Image to Enlarge.



Detail from the Above Document Showing the Names of the Petitioners from
the Settlement of Westchester.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.

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Monday, April 23, 2018

Brief Obituary of Maria Rapelje of Pelham Who Died in 1803, a Daughter of Pelham's Rem Rapelje and Helen (Hardenbrook) Rapelje


The obituary was brief; only twenty two words.  It marked the end of a brief life, that of Miss Maria Rapelje of Pelham.  She was the beloved daughter of Pelhamite Rem Rapelje and his wife, Helen (Hardenbrook) Rapelje.  Maria was only twenty years old at the time of her death on July 20, 1803.

Historic Pelham has published a host of articles on the Rapelje family, early Pelham pioneers.  See, e.g.:

Fri., Mar. 03, 2017:  The Will of Rem Rapelje of Pelham, Probated on November 20, 1805.

Thu., Mar. 02, 2017:  1805 Advertisement Reveals Much About the Pelham Farm of Rem Rapelje

Fri., Jan. 08, 2016:  Pelhamite Rem Rapelje, a Loyalist, Was "Rode on Rails" During the Revolutionary War

Wed., Oct. 03, 2007:  Book by George Rapelje, Pelham Resident Along With His Father, Rem Rapelje, Published in 1834

Mon., Feb. 27, 2006:  Another Description of the Farm of Rem Rapelje of Pelham Published in 1806

Wed., Aug. 24, 2005:  1807 Advertisement for Sale of Property of Rem Rapelje in Pelham.

Maria Rapelje is buried in the cemetery of Saint Paul's Church National Historic Site located at today's address of 897 S. Columbus Avenue, Mount Vernon, New York.  The beautiful church, construction of which began in 1765 to replace an earlier wooden structure, stands within what once was the Village of Eastchester.  A section of the Eastchester Village Green remains in front of the church today.  The church was one of several in the wider region that served Pelham families in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

The Rapelje family was closely aligned with Saint Paul's Church.  Indeed, the magnificent pump organ located in the loft of the church that was crafted by Henry Erben of New York City was commissioned by George Rapelje, an original pew holder in Saint Paul's Church, at a cost of $800 in 1833 (about $36,500 in today's dollars).  The organ "remains one of the oldest working organs in the United States" according to the site.

The obituary of young Maria Rapelje appeared in the July 30, 1803 issue of The Spectator published in New York City ten days after her death.  The brief obituary is transcribed below, followed by a citation and link to its source.


Detail of Map Prepared in 1853 Showing Pelham Neck and Lands Owned
by the Rapelje Family. Source: Dripps, Matthew & Conner, R.F.O.,
Southern Part of West-Chester County N. Y. (1853) (Museum of the City
of New York, No. 29.100.2628). NOTE: Click on Image to Enlarge.

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"DIED.

On Wednesday the 20th inst. at the Manor of Pelham, Eastchester, Miss MARIA RAPELJE, in the 20th year of her age."

Source:  DIED, The Spectator [NY, NY], Jul. 30, 1803, Vol. VI, No. 625, p. 3, col. 3.

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Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.

Order a Copy of "Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak."

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Friday, April 20, 2018

The Pelham Firemen Baseball Team in 1926


For many years in the early 20th century, firemen in the Village of North Pelham had a baseball team known as the Pelham Firemen (aka the "Smokeaters").  The team was a "semi-pro" team that had a storied history and became a Pelham athletic institution,  Indeed, the team placed a number of ball players including Paddy Smith and Bob Cremins in the Major League and others such as Ed Lohman in what we would call today the Minors. I have written before about the team and some of its members.  See:

Thu., Feb. 15, 2018:  Baseball Battles Between Pelham Firemen and the Ossining All-Stars in 1926.

Mon., Jan. 29, 2018:  Famed Pelham Athlete Bob Cremins Made the Boston Red Sox Team in 1927.

Wed., Jan. 11, 2017:  Baseball Star Paddy Smith of Pelham.

In 1926 and 1927, the Pelham Firemen repeatedly battled a team known as the Ossining All-Stars for bragging rights within Westchester County. The baseball battles between the two teams were known as "old time feuds" and typically involved thrilling, and surprisingly good, baseball entertainment for very large crowds of spectators. The local newspaper, The Pelham Sun, carried lengthy and breathless accounts of the games.

In 1926, the Manager of the team was Abe Zernoski.  The coach was Sergt. J. Taylor.  The team had a "mascot" (a young boy who likely served as a batboy) named Bernard Marvel.  Bob Cremins pitched and played outfield.  Other members of the team included W. "Basche" Smith, Ed Lohman, Robert "Bob" Reilly, W. Cassin, O. Smith, E. Lyon, H. Aurisy, R. Aurisy, A. Halliday, and W. Reilly.  

Near the end of the 1926 season, The Pelham Sun published a summary of the team's performance and a wonderful photograph of the team.  As of mid-August of that season, Bob Cremins was the batting leader with an incredible average of .467.  Bache Smith was hitting .333.  The team's record was 9 wins and 7 losses.  It should come as no surprise that the article also made much of the rivalry between the Pelham club and the Ossining All Stars.  The two teams battled each other for primacy throughout much of the late 1920s.

Both the team photograph and the description of the 1926 season make for interesting reading for students of Pelham history.  Both are included below.


"Back row left to right:  --  A. Zernoski (Mgr.), W. Smith, R. Cremins, R. Reilly,
W. Cassin, E. Lohman, O. Smith, E. Lyon, Sergt. J. Taylor (Coach).  Front
Row:  --  H. Aurisy, H. Smith, R. Aurisy, B. Marvel (Mascot), A. Halliday, W.
Reilly (Captain), J. Flanagan."  Source:  PELHAM FIREMEN'S BASEBALL
TEAMThe Pelham Sun, Aug. 13, 1926, Vol. 17, No. 24, p. 1, cols. 3-5.
NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

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"Starting the season with what appeared to be just a regular small town team, the Pelham Fire Department nine has worked its way up until now it ranks with the best in Westchester and is regarded as one of the biggest drawing cards in the County.  Wherever they have played, their services have always been in demand for a return game because their style of play is clean.  So far this season, they have won nine and lost seven games.  Three of these losses have gone into extra innings, said games being dropped to the Mt. Kisco Indians, the Ossining All Stars whom they later defeated, and the Yonkers K. of C.

Up to date, the boys have been batting at a .277 clip, which coupled with the good pitching of the hurling staff accounts largely for their success.  Bob Cremins, pitcher and outfielder is leading the sluggers with a percentage of .467.  He has been to bat 30 times and has hit fourteen times.  W. 'Basche' Smith is the second leading batter.  His average to date is .333.  He has been to bat 24 times and has hit 8 times.

Ed Lohman who has undertaken most of the assignments on the mound for the 'smoke-eaters' has proven his worth on all occasions.  Cremins, W. Reilly, and J. Rheinhardt have also distinguished themselves on the mound for the locals.

Arrangements are being made for a three-game series between the Firemen and Ossining All Stars for the semi-pro championship of Westchester.  It took Ossining twelve innings to turn the trick in the first game when they won 4-3.  In the second appearance of the 'smoke-eaters,' they returned with the bacon, beating the All-Stars 2-0.  Pelham has dropped a contest to the Tuckahoe A. C., the same team being defeated by the Ossining aggregation.  Pelham will have a chance to avenge their defeat at the hands of the Tuckahoe nine in two weeks, and this will give the fans a chance for a closer comparison of the two teams.  Fans are eagerly looking forward to this series with the Ossining team as they are certain the locals now have the number of the All Star outfit, and will take them over in the majority of the games."

Source:  PELHAM FIREMEN'S BASEBALL TEAM, The Pelham Sun, Aug. 13, 1926, Vol. 17, No. 24, p. 1, cols. 3-5.

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Thursday, April 19, 2018

Native American Tales of Early Pelham Days Published in 1899


Pelham and the surrounding region likely have been inhabited for more than 10,000 years.  Indeed, though we seldom take time to observe, there is evidence of Native American habitation all around us.  Indeed, I have written on many occasions of the Native Americans who inhabited Pelham before Thomas Pell acquired the lands.  Immediately below are links to a few recent examples with a more extensive list at the end of today's article.  

Mon., Feb. 01, 2016:  Did the Native Americans Who Sold Land to Thomas Pell in 1654 Understand the Nature of the Sale?

Tue., Sep. 15, 2015:  Should the Siwanoy Elementary School Should Be Renamed?

Wed., Apr. 02, 2014:  17th Century Record Identifies One of the Native Americans Who Signed Pell's 1654 Deed as a Wiechquaeskeck, NOT a Siwanoy.

Wed., Jan. 29, 2014:  There Were No Native Americans Known as Siwanoys.  

Today's Historic Pelham article transcribes the text of a newspaper article that appeared in the April 16, 1899 issue of The Brooklyn Daily Eagle about Native American tales of the early days of our region.  It is a brief but fascinating look at 19th century views of local Native Americans who preceded today's Pelhamites as residents of the lands that became the Manor of Pelham.  


Thomas Pell's Handwritten Copy of the So-Called
"Indian Deed" by Which Native Americans Sold Him
the Lands That Included Today's Pelham on June
27, 1654.  A Transcription of the Handwritten Text of
the Document Prepared by the Author of this Article
Appears Near the End of this Article.  NOTE:  Click
on Image to Enlarge.


Munsee Family Like Wiechquaesgecks Who Once
Inhabited the Region Including Today's Pelham
and Sold Lands to Thomas Pell on June 27, 1654.
NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

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"STRUGGLES OF EARLY SETTLERS
-----
Tales of Indian Warfare in Which the Borough of the Bronx Abounds -- Its Revolutionary History.
-----

'They call themselves Manettas; they are the devil himself!'  That was what an early Dutch settler thought of the Indians he found in what is now the Bronx borough of New York City.  And he was about right.  Nowhere do we read of a more extensive Indian population, nowhere were there fiercer contests between the red and the white man than in the borough of the Bronx.

In 1626 the whole of Manhattan Island was purchased from the Indians for -- $24 in beads and trinkets.  The Governor has been accused of driving a sharp bargain, but he was, like the Irishman, 'buying a pig in a poke.'  If that sum had been put out at compound interest on May 6, 1626, at 6 per cent, how much would it amount to now?  That is a query.

The first Indian to feel the effects of alcohol secured it in the cabin of the Half Moon, as she lay in the Hudson, below Yonkers.  Recovering from their astonishment at the sight of the strange craft, they ventured aboard.  When they tried to leave Hudson detained two of their number, 'putting red coats on them.'  He acknowledged that he first broke faith with them.  On his return down the river the Half Moon found a most warlike fleet of canoes ready for a fight.  At Spuyten Duyvil a volley of arrows greeted the voyagers, 'in recompense whereof six muskets replied and killed two or three of them.'  At Fort Washington 'a falcon shot killed two and the rest fled.'  The Half Moon then 'hurried down the bay and escaped in safety.'

Long as it is since the red men departed from the Bronx the residents are still finding more and more evidence of their presence.  Occupying the greater portion of Westchester County were the Sewanoes.  They even extended into portions of Connecticut, or Quinnehtukqut, as they called it.  Anne Hutchinson, the noted refugee, came fleeing to Pelham Neck, where she settled and lived on the best of terms with the Sewanoes.  One day, however, down came a party of hostile Weckquaesgeeks, from near Yonkers.  They burned her house, they slew her and all her family, except her little granddaughter, whom they carried off into captivity.  This was the beginning of a series of almost unparalleled Indian atrocities in this whole region, terminated by a treaty of peace that was signed at the home of Jonas Bronck, the first white settler on the Westchester shores, who lived near the present Gouverneur Morris mansion, in the southern portion of Bronxland.

Among the wilds of Pelham Neck the Sewanoes had a well fortified settlement and a burying ground.  Many Indian relics are constantly being discovered in that part of the park, such as old pottery, banner stones, and Indian skulls.  On Hunter's Island, close to the shore, two famous Indian sachems, Ranaque and Taekamuck, lie buried.  They were the very last to die of the great and powerful tribe of Sewanoes.

Many wonder at the signboard reading, 'The Indian Field of Van Cortlandt Park.'  On this site lies buried a brave band of Stockbridge Indians, who died fighting on the side of the colonists after a gallant battle in what is now Van Cortlandt Park.  Among the slain were the Indian chieftain Nimham and his son.  The old sachem refused to flee, saying he 'was old, and would die there.'

There is an Indian shell heap on the west bank of the Harlem, just below the Century House.  On this spot the red men for countless ages had a settlement and ate their favorite oysters, and piled the shells close to the river in a heap.  They are there yet.

Prior to European settlement the most prominent tribe of Indians which inhabited this territory was the Weekquaesgeeks.  Their hunting grounds were south of an irregular line drawn east and west from the Hudson River to Long Island Sound, passiving through the head waters of the Potantico, Nepperhan and the Bronx Rivers.  Their settlements are attested by mounds, shell beds, stone hatchets, spear heads and arrow heads found on the shores, hummocks and uplands which extend from the mouth of the Pocantico, at Tarrytown, to the rocks bearing indian inscriptions on Hunter's Island, in Pelham Bay Park.  Their actions in this region are recorded in history by mention of the first treaty made between them and the Dutch in 1642, at the house of Jonas Bronck, or Bronx, which stood near the outlet of Mill Brook near the present terminus of Brook avenue, at Harlem Kills; their massacres and destruction of farms, in violation of that treaty, about 1655, of Vanderdonck's colony in what is now Van Cortlandt Park; the celebrated Annie Hutchinson's murder near the split rock in Pelham Bay Park, and the driving away of Throckmorton and his associates from Throgg's Neck.  Land titles in the Bronx begin with deeds from members of that tribe, preceding or supplementing Dutch ground briefs and patents and grants, borough and manorial charters granted by the English.

The colonial history of this region abounds with tales of Indian warfare; the famous John Underhill of Pequod fame came over from New England to help the Dutch.  Controversies arose as to lands and jurisdictions, the establishment of ferries over the Harlem and Spuyten Duyvil so as to meet the two main thoroughfares of the province, ledaing respectively to Albany and Connecticut, the portion now Westchester being for a short time under the jurisdiction of Long Island, while the most westerly and southerly had in it the three manors of Phillipsburgh, Fordham and Morrisania with their courts leet and appellate tribunals at Harlem or before the Mayor of New York.  In 1691 Westchester County was erected, which brought all this region under the one jurisdiction but with separate representatives for the borough.

At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War the Vanderdonck's land was vested in Van Cortlandts by the female line descendants of the Philipses, and a Phillips was collecting toll at Kingsbridge.  The ferry at Harlem, which had its landing at a place on the north side of One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street, near First avenue, and on the Morris estate on the Bronx side of the river, led to a road corresponding somewhat to Third avenue and Boston Road, as it is now known, and thence to DeLancey's mill at West Farms and the Kingsbridge road as it now runs from West Farms to the Farmer's bridge.

The Fordham road ran from the Kingsbridge rod to Harlem River, then called Fordham or Berrian's Landing, and the road now called the Macomb's Dam road ran then, as now, to where it joins Jerome avenue and thence to a point in Highbridgeville near the Anderson property, on the western slope of Cromwell's Creek.  Such was the 'lay out' of the north side at the opening of hostilities with Great Britain.

The personnel of its inhabitants had changed somewhat from the beginning of the English colonial period.  The Vancordtlandts held most of what had been 'Vandoncks land,' some of them royalists, others brave soldiers in the continental regiments; parts of the Fordham and West Farms patents and parts of the Turner High Bridge holding had been purchased as 'addicional' land by the Morris family, lords of the adjoining Manor of Morrisania, which had also taken in Bronxland.  The men of this family took up the American side of the controversy.  Lewis the elder, Lord of the Manor, was a member of the Continental Congress and signer of the Declaration of Independence; Gouverneur, his brother, represented the county in the Provincial Congress of New York, and Richard of Fordham, a royal commissioner of the Court of Admiralty, resigned his lucrative post, and as a reward had his house and farm at Fordham destroyed by the British, took refuge in the American lines, and with his brother Gouverneur helped make the first state constitution and served as senator from this region.  The other parts of the Fordham and West Farms, Turneur and Westchester patents ahd, by sale and inheritance, passed into other hands."

Source:  STRUGGLES OF EARLY SETTLERS -- Tales of Indian Warfare in Which the Borough of the Bronx Abounds -- Its Revolutionary History, The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Apr. 16, 1899, p. 42, cols. 4-5 (NOTE:  Paid subscription required to access via this link).  

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Below is a bibliography with links to available items regarding local Native Americans who inhabited the lands that came to be known as the Manor of Pelham.  

Bell, Blake A., Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak (Lincoln, NE: iUniverse, Inc., 2004) (book published to commemorate Pelham's 350th anniversary in 2004). 

Bell, Blake, Thomas Pell's Treaty Oak, The Westchester Historian, Vol. 28, Issue 3, pp. 73-81 (The Westchester County Historical Society, Summer 2002).

Tue., Feb. 23, 2016:  Native American Legends of Pelham's "Rising Sun Rock" and "The Living Water" Spring.

Mon., Feb. 01, 2016:  Did the Native Americans Who Sold Land to Thomas Pell in 1654 Understand the Nature of the Sale?

Tue., Sep. 15, 2015:  Should the Siwanoy Elementary School Should Be Renamed?

Mon., Sep. 07, 2015:  Why Did Native Americans Sell Lands Including Today's Pelham First to the Dutch and then to the English?

Mon., Aug. 17, 2015:  Buyer's Remorse: After Thomas Pell Bought Pelham From Native Americans, He Wanted His Money Back!

Wed., Apr. 02, 2014:  17th Century Record Identifies One of the Native Americans Who Signed Pell's 1654 Deed as a Wiechquaeskeck, NOT a Siwanoy.

Tue., Mar. 25, 2014:  More 17th Century References to Native Americans in the Manor of Pelham.

Wed., Jan. 29, 2014:  There Were No Native Americans Known as Siwanoys.

Wednesday, April 02, 2014:  17th Century Record Identifies One of the Native Americans Who Signed Pell's 1654 Deed as a Wiechquaeskeck, NOT a Siwanoy. 

Mon., Dec. 31, 2007:  Research Regarding Anhooke, One of the Native Americans Who Signed the Treaty by Which Thomas Pell Acquired Lands That Became the Manor of Pelham.  

Fri., Nov. 02, 2007:  Information About William Newman, One of the Englishmen Who Signed Thomas Pell's Treaty on June 27, 1654.

Thu., Nov. 01, 2007:  Information About John Ffinch, One of the Englishmen Who Signed Thomas Pell's "Treaty" on June 27, 1654.

Wed., Oct. 31, 2007:  Information About Richard Crabb, One of the Englishmen Who Signed Thomas Pell's "Treaty" on June 27, 1654.

Tue., Oct. 30, 2007:  Information About Henry Accorly, One of the Englishmen Who Signed Thomas Pell's "Treaty" on June 27, 1654.

Tue., Oct. 16, 2007:  Information About Thomas Pell's Treaty Oak Published in 1912.

Fri., Aug. 10, 2007:  Information About William Newman, A Witness to the Signing of Thomas Pell's "Treaty" with Local Native Americans on June 27, 1654.

Thu., Aug. 09, 2007:  Information About John Ffinch:  A Witness to the Signing of Thomas Pell's "Treaty" with Local Native Americans on June 27, 1654.

Tue., Jul. 24, 2007:  Article About the Pell Treaty Oak Published in 1909.

Mon., Jul. 23, 2007:  1906 Article in The Sun Regarding Fire that Destroyed the Pell Treaty Oak.

Wed., May 02, 2007:  Information About Thomas Pell's Treaty Oak Published in 1922.

Fri., Nov. 03, 2006:  More About Richard Crabb, the "Magistrate" Who Witnessed the Signing of Thomas Pell's "Treaty" with Local Native Americans on June 27, 1654.  

Fri., Sep. 29, 2006:  Intriguing Evidence of the Amount Thomas Pell Paid Native Americans for the Manor of Pelham.  

Fri., Sep. 22, 2006:  Henry Accorly: A Witness to the Signing of Thomas Pell's "Treaty" with Local Native Americans on June 27, 1654.  

Fri., Sep. 15, 2006:  William Newman:  A Witness to the Signing of Thomas Pell's "Treaty" with Local Native Americans on June 27, 1654

Thu., May 18, 2006:  Richard Crabb, the "Magistrate" Who Witnessed the Signing of Thomas Pell's "Treaty" with Local Native Americans on June 27, 1654.

Thu., Apr. 13, 2006:  Rumors in 1657 That Thomas Pell Manipulated Local Native Americans To Protect His Land Acquisition From Incursions by the Dutch.

Fri., Jul. 29, 2005:  Has Another Piece of the Treaty Oak Surfaced?

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

The Building Boom in Pelham in 1925 and 1926 at the Height of the Roaring Twenties


The Great Depression was still years to come.  The American economy was humming along.  New York City and the surrounding region including one of the city's closest neighbors, the little Town of Pelham, were in the midst of major real estate and construction booms.  The Roaring Twenties were underway.

Historic Pelham has published a number of articles about Pelham's building boom during the Roaring Twenties.  For a few of many, many examples, see:

Fri., Aug. 14, 2015:  The Massive Real Estate Boom of the Roaring Twenties in the Little Town of Pelham.  

Fri., Mar. 02, 2018:  Construction of the Peldean Court Apartments on Fifth Avenue in 1922.

Fri., Apr. 13, 2018:  Plans in 1922 For Massive "Olgalorna" Apartment Complex Preceded Construction of Witherbee Court on the Same Site Overlooking Pelham Country Club.

In 1925, more construction occurred on the Village of Pelham Manor than ever before in its history.  Planned construction of the Hutchinson River Parkway was well underway.  Developments along Boston Post Road and Split Rock Road were in the planning stages as well. Homes were being built along much of the Esplanade, including sections near the Hutchinson River and Mount Vernon border.  Large neighborhood developments like the Beech Tree Lane section were in the planning stages.  Most significantly, large open tracts of land were becoming scarce in Pelham Manor as groups of one-family homes were "being developed on on a large building scale."  Additionally, major construction of industrial complexes, warehouse complexes, and garages was completed in 1925 in that area of Pelham Manor southwest of today's Hutchinson River Parkway in the area of today's Fairway Market and the associated shopping plaza.

A local newspaper report published in 1926 provided an apt summary of the magnitude of the construction boom in Pelham Manor including the following:

"[I]n many places, there is the appearance of a boom in the growth of the village, but this growth is carefully guarded by village officials so that the future housing situation in the village will not be disturbed.  Zoning and building ordinances are fully enforced, and the houses erected appeal to one's artistic sense and to one's desire for individuality.  Even where a group of 15 or 20 small homes are being erected by one concern in a limited area, each house has its own characteristics, and repetition of color, design or location is studiously avoided.

During the past year, the number of permits for dwellings alone was 118, representing a total of $1,724,593 in this field.  The total garage permits aggregated $15,040, while $29,180 was spent in alterations which in many cases meant the complete remodelling of an older dwelling.  Business building permits were issued to a total amount of $53,990.  The latter include a $16,000 warehouse and garage built by the Sinclair Refining company off the Boston Post road; a $12,000 storage development by the Westchester Lighting company off the Boston Post road; a $12,000 storage development by the Westchester Lighting company; the Mullins building with stores on Pelhamdale avenue, and several small offices and other business buildings of a small type outside the residential districts and on the outward edges of the village.  The interior parts of the village have been religiously guarded against business invasion.

Among the large residential developments in this village is the creation of Pelham Gardens, with 45 small homes, by the Altieri company.  Building in Pelham Manor has been directed along substantial lines, with a view to continuing the prestige of the village as a residential place for the home-owner.  In other parts of the village, the Pelham Realty company is also constructing groups of small homes in artistic units."

The real estate boom of the mid-twenties was so substantial that a real estate section in The Daily Argus published in Mount Vernon included a two-page article with photographs and advertisements describing the huge building boom in Pelham.  The entire article and many of the photographs and advertisements are included below as part of today's Historic Pelham article.


"Construction has been started on Pelham Gables, above, at Sixth avenue
and Fourth street, North Pelham, and this newest apartment will cost about
$400,000.  Excavation for the structure was started last week."  Source:
The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and
Building Edition, Pelham Page 2, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"WITHERBEE COURT -- Pelham Manor, New York"
PELHAM HGTSThe Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926,
1926 Realty and Building Edition, Pelham Page 2, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:
Click on Image to Enlarge.


"'Peldean Court,' one of the John T. Brook attractive dwellings on
Fifth avenue, North Pelham."  Source:  TREMENDOUS BUILDING
BOOM EXPERIENCED IN PELHAM HGTSThe Daily Argus [Mount
Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition, Pelham
Page 2, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"OWN YOUR OWN HOME --and be Happy-- 
IN PELHAM"  Source:  TREMENDOUS BUILDING
BOOM EXPERIENCED IN PELHAM HGTSThe Daily Argus [Mount
Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition, Pelham
Page 2, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"Among the handsomest school buildings in the state!  That is the
opinion of persons who have visited the enlarged Pelham Memorial
high school.  The new wing which doubles the former seating
capacity, was completed some months ago."  Source:
ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925The Daily Argus [Mount
Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition,
Pelham Page 1, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"PELHAM The Most Beautiful of Suburban Towns."  Source:
ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925The Daily Argus [Mount
Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition,
Pelham Page 1, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"This is 'Pelnord Court,' located on Fifth avenue, North Pelham."  Source:
ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925The Daily Argus [Mount
Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition,
Pelham Page 1, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"Here Is YOUR Chance!"  Source:
ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925The Daily Argus [Mount
Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition,
Pelham Page 1, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.


"'Pelbrook Hall,' another attractive type of apartment house in North
PERMITS ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925The Daily Argus [Mount
Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition,
Pelham Page 1, cols. 1-8.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

*          *          *          *          *

"Great Progress Is Also Seen In The Pelhams
-----
BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925
-----

Including the new Witherbee Court apartments at a probable estimated value of $350,000, building permits representing $2,172,803 in building operations were issued in Pelham Manor during the last yer, up to January 1, 1926.  A total of 161 permits were issued during this period by former Building Inspector William Templeton and by Arthur Telford, present building inspector, who has been holding thaat office during the greater part of the last year.

These permits represent various types of building construction, including apartments, private dwellings, private garage, and a few scattered business and small office structures.  The greatest trend of building construction has been in the erection of private residences, which is naturally in keeping with Pelham Manor's renown and an exclusively residential section.  The only large apartment development of the past year has been the Witherbee Court improvement.  

More building has been going on during the past year in this village than at any time in its history, and in view of the projected developments along the Boston Post road, and in the vicinity of Split Rock road, the coming year will probably seem an even greater increase of prosperity in this line.  The construction of the Hutchinson Parkway through the latter section is expected to be a great contributory factor for the future growth of this end of the village.

New buildings are being constantly erected along the Esplanade toward the Mount Vernon side, and along Pelhamdale avenue.  In fact in many parts of the village are groups of one-family houses being erected, and open tracts of land becoming fewer and fewer, are being developed on a large building scale.  The result is that in many places, there is the appearance of a boom in the growth of the village, but this growth is carefully guarded by village officials so that the future housing situation in the village will not be disturbed.  Zoning and building ordinances are fully enforced, and the houses erected appeal to one's artistic sense and to one's desire for individuality.  Even where a group of 15 or 20 small homes are being erected by one concern in a limited area, each house has its own characteristics, and repetition of color, design or location is studiously avoided.

During the past year, the number of permits for dwellings alone was 118, representing a total of $1,724,593 in this field.  The total garage permits aggregated $15,040, while $29,180 was spent in alterations which in many cases meant the complete remodelling of an older dwelling.  Business building permits were issued to a total amount of $53,990.  The latter include a $16,000 warehouse and garage built by the Sinclair Refining company off the Boston Post road; a $12,000 storage development by the Westchester Lighting company off the Boston Post road; a $12,000 storage development by the Westchester Lighting company; the Mullins building with stores on Pelhamdale avenue, and several small offices and other business buildings of a small type outside the residential districts and on the outward edges of the village.  The interior parts of the village have been religiously guarded against business invasion.

Among the large residential developments in this village is the creation of Pelham Gardens, with 45 small homes, by the Altieri company.  Building in Pelham Manor has been directed along substantial lines, with a view to continuing the prestige of the village as a residential place for the home-owner.  In other parts of the village, the Pelham Realty company is also constructing groups of small homes in artistic units.

A projected development of which more is expected to be heard during the coming year is the recent announcement that 150 homes may be constructed in a new realty project on land at Split Rock road and Boston Post road, overlooking the Hutchinson Parkway.

The proposed elimination of the Pelham sewage disposal plant in the Mount Tom section [sic] of Pelham Manor, through which the Hutchinson Parkway is to pass, will open up another tract of land for possible development in the near future.  The elimination of this plant along with the development of the parkway project, and the construction of a sewer through this section would open up a large tract of land for development in Pelham Manor at the westerly end of the Esplanade.

The present tendency, however, seems to be toward the development of unoccupied tracts of land in the more improved parts of the village, wherever such tracts or plots can be found.  Small one-family houses ranging from $10,000 to $25,000 seem to be the most popular form of building here.  Quite often a more pretentious home is put up at a considerably higher cost, but in general, the newest residences here are of the six and seven room type, generally in various forms of stucco or brick construction, artistically designed and executed.

The following are the building permits issued by Building Inspector Arthur Telford and former Inspector William Templeton in Pelham Manor during the past year, including some of those issued to date:

Robert Mullins, dwelling, Townsend avenue, $18,000, January 3; George S. Douglas and Walter E. Hall, dwelling, Boston Post road, $10,500, January 8; Florence Thomas, dwelling, Rochelle Terrace, $10,000, January 8; E. Henderson and C. Christensen, dwelling and garage, Iden avenue and Carol place, $9,000, January 17; Bonmar Development corporation, dwelling and garage, 14 Bonmar road, $20,000, February 2; William Templeton and Son, dwelling and garage, Siwanoy place, $12,000, February 16; William Templeton and son, dwelling and garage, Siwanoy place, $12,000, February 16; H. A. and H. R. Swift, dwelling and garage, Hunter avenue, $8,000, February 18; E. B. Horgan, garage, Monterey avenue and Pelhamdale avenue, $475, February 21; Wynnewood Gardens, Inc., dwelling and garage, Wynnewood road, $10,000, February 21; Morton R. Cross, alterations, 997 Edgewood avenue, $3,500, February 24; T. Nelson Word, dwelling, Mount Tom road, $18,000, February 25; Charles B. Bloemecke, dwelling, Edgemere street, $6,500, February 25; A. R. Schulze, dwelling, Townsend avenue, $9,000, February 25; Sinclair Refining company, warehouse and garage, off Boston Post road, $16,000, February 25.

Thomas L. McCready, dwelling and garage, corner Grant avenue and Terrace place, $16,000, March 3; Gunnar Windfors, dwelling and garage, Grant avenue, $8,000, March 7; James C. McGovern, dwelling and garage, corner Francis street and Suburban avenue, $13,000, March 7; W. E. Hall and G. E. Douglas, dwelling and garage, Boston road, $13,000, March 14; A. F. Harmett, garage, Clay avenue, $600, March 14; Thomas L. McCready, dwelling and garage, corner Grant and Union avenues, $10,000, March 18; R. M. Mullins, dwelling, Grant avenue, $18,000, March 25; Thomas H. Jensen, dwelling and garage Windsor place, $8,000, March 25; Paul Vione, dwelling and garage, Park Lane, $35,000, March 25; Mrs. L. F. Carillo, garage, 400 Pelhamdale avenue, $475, March 25; W. D. Strack, alterations, 1019 Esplanade, $5,500, March 25; Westchester Improvement corporation, dwelling and garage, Bowman road, $10,000, March 25; Herkier Inc., dwelling and garage, Esplanade and Wolf's lane, $15,000, March 25; L. H. Austin, dwelling, Esplanade, $45,000, March 30; Leo Sullivan, dwelling, Windsor place, $9,500, March 30.

Joseph P. Ryan, dwelling and garage, Timpson street and Esplanade, $9,500, April 6; Helen C. Salch, office, 4340 Boston Post road, $250, April 6; Lester D. Nott garage and alterations, 426 Rochelle Terrace, $2,500, April 6; E. G. Barrow, garage, Pelhamdale avenue and Mount Tom road, $500, April 7; Marcella C. Craven, dwelling and garage, Hudson street, $17,800, April 13; Emily Marshall, dwelling and garage, Hudson street, $17,800, April 13; Emily Marshall, dwelling and garage, Hudson street, $17,800 April 13; Guy C. Mariner, Inc., dwelling, Colonial and Highbrook avenues, $25,000, April 13; Gertrude Thomas, dwelling, James street and Sherwood avenues, $14,000, April 13; Harry S. Haupt, garage, Black street, $1,500, April 14; Harry S. Haupt, garage, Esplanade and Black street, $1,500, Apirl 14; Harry S. Haupt, garage, Pelhamdale avenue and Black street, $1,500, April 14; F. R. Selleck, garage, 4 Stellar avenue, $490, Apirl 21; Eliza Martucci, dwelling, Hunter avenue, $7,000, April 21; Livinston Leeds, dwelling, Townsen avenue, $22,000, April 21; J. F. Patten, garage, Esplanade, $1,800, April 21; August Ackerman, garage, 473 Wolf's lne, $400, April 23; Mr. Dawson, garage, 100 Pelham Manor road, $500, April 28; Coal and Transfer Co., coal screen, Pelham Parkway, $1,000, April 28; Jocelyn Realty Co. Inc., dwelling, Peace street, $17,000, April 28; Peter Rhynas, dwelling and garage, Wolf's lane, $14,000, April 28.

Boualt Realty Co. Inc., garage, Lawrence place, $100, May 6; Boualt Realty Co., 4 garages, James street, at $100 each, May 6; Thomas J. Good dwelling and garage, Highbrook and Townsend avenues, $17,000, May 6; Alfonso Faganni, dwelling, Jackson avenue, $18,000, May 6; Ubald Landry, dwelling and garage, Plymouth street, $13950, May 6; Pelham Country club, alterations, Boston Post road, $1,500, May 6; Charles Bloemecke, dwelling, Edgemere place, $6,500, May 9; Mrs. Mildred L. Hamblen, alterations, Fowler avenue, $1,600, May 9; Jocelyn Realty Co., dwelling, Peace street, $22,000, :May 12; Deborah E. Wagner, alterations, Iden avenue and Carol place, $3,500, May 12; J. Charles Albrecht, dwelling, Carol place, $14,700, May 12; John Butcher, garage, Washington avenue, $1,000, May 16; Guy C. Mariner, Inc., dwelling, Heywood road, $30,000, May 16; Charles B. Bloemecke, garage, Edgemere place, $400, May 16; Groll Riding school, garage, Rosedale avenue $400, May 16; Charles B. Bloemecke, garage, Townsend avenue, $12,500, May 21; Charles B. Bloemecke, dwelling, Townsend avenue, $12,500, May 21; Harold A. Swift, dwelling, Grant avenue and Edgemere place, $9,493, May 26; Felix T. Hughes, dwelling, Heywood road, $27,500, May 28.

Pelham Manor Realty Corp., four dwellings and garages, Washington avenue, at $10,000 each, June 1; John T. Snyder, dwelling, corner Witherbee avenue and Pelham Manor road, $75,000, June 2; Peter Rhynas, garage, Wolf's lane, $700, June 4; Pelham Manor Realty Co., dwelling corner Monroe and Clay avenues, $10,000, June 4; Harry Babock, dwelling, Grant avenue and Union street, $9,300, June 4; W. E. Reyer, dwelling and garage, Esplanade and Hogen street, $38,000, June 4.

T. Pierce, dwelling, Boston road, $22,000, July 8; H. J. C. Miller, dwelling, corner Monterey avenue and Mitchill place, $18,000, July 10; Acarfilm Corp., portable factory, Boston road, $340, July 6; Alfonzo Faganni, dweling, Esplanade, $16,000, July 11; Pelham Manor Realty corporation, four dwellings, Hunter avenue, at $10,000 each, July 10; Edward Hehre, dwelling, James street, $12,000; Lincoln Randall, dwelling, Colonial avenue, $10,000; Hugh J. Smallem, dwelling, Washington avenue, $12,000; Pelham Manor Realty company, six dwellings, Clay avenue, at $10,000 each; Westchester Lighting company, storage land, at the Lighting plant, $12,000; Witherbee Court corporation, apartment.  Wynnewood road; Gunnar Lindfors, dwelling, Union street, $8,000; Pelham Manor Realty company, seven dwellings, Pelham Manor gardens, at $10,000 each.

John Smith, dwelling, Rockledge drive, $45,000; L. Harreld, dwelling, Hunter avenue, $10,000; Pelham Manor Summer home, dwelling, Split Rock road, $1,600; Matteo Bortone, dwelling, Pelhamdale and Monterey avenues, $16,000; Edgewood Avenue Realty company, alterations, Edgewood avenue, $9,000; Charles B. Bloemecke, garage, Edgemere place, $250; Lawrence Wardrop, garage, Edgemere place, $450; Bradley Randall, dwelling, Park lane, $20,000; Norman E. Donnelly, dwelling, Iden and Pelhamdale avenues, $8,500; Charles B. Bloemecke, dwelling, Monroe street, $7,600; Mrs. Huittenberg, alterations, Split Rock road, $800; Angelina Nordone, two dwellings, Murray street, at $10,000 each; Guy C. Mariner, garage, Heywood road, $890; Elsie Nybern, dwelling, Terrace place, $12,000.

Pelham Manor Realty company, dwelling, Garden road and Garden place, $10,000; Pelham Manor Realty company, four dwellings, Garden place and Washington avenues, $10,000 each, September 15; William J. Bloemecke, dwelling, Monroe street, $5,000, September 17; J. George Costello, dwelling, Ely avenue, $2,000, September 25; Gertrude Thomas, dwelling, James street, $13,000, September 25; Max Block, dwelling, Wolf's lane, $18,000, September 26; Emily Marshall, dwelling, Hudson street, $14,450.

Pelham Manor Realty company, two dwellings, at $10,000 each; Pel-
-----
Continued on Other Pelham Page

GREAT PROGRESS IS ALSO SEEN IN THE PELHAMS
-----
BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925
-----
Continued from First Pelham Page
-----

ham Manor Realty company, dwelling, Monroe street and Garden road, $10,000; Pelham Manor Realty company, dwelling, Garden Place, $10,000; Pelham Manor Realty company, dwelling, Monroe street, $10,000; Robert M. Mullins, stores, Pelhamdale avenue, $20,000; Ellen R. Cottrell, alterations, Highland avenue, $680; Samuel W. Bradley, dwelling, Monroe street, $8,000; C. O. Jackson, dwelling, Edgewood avenue, $22,000; Thomas Good, dwelling, Peace street, $11,000; E. W. Siedler, dwelling, Rochelle Terrace, $11,000; Guy C. Mariner, dwelling, Country Club lane, $12,500; Theodore M. Hill, garage, Highland avenue, $900; George Jeffers, dwelling, Mount Tom road, $65,000; J. A. Lehman, dwelling, Hunter avenue, $11,000; Lillian Bonothal, dwelling, Esplanade, $14,500; Lawrence Wardrop, dwelling, Grant avenue, $8,900; Clifford Wiehman, dwelling, Monterey avenue, $58,000; Antonio Longo, dwelling, Monterey avenue, $20,000; Coal, and Transfer Co., office, Secor lane, $4,4000.

The following are among the permits issued during the last month; Livingston Leeds, dwelling, Jackson avenue, $20,000; Fish and Marvin office, Boston road and Pelhamdale avenue, $4,000; Jocelyn Realty Co., two garages, Peace street, $480 each; W. B. Landay, dwelling, Plymouth street, $16,400; Gunnar Lindfors, dwelling, Union street, $7,000."

Source:  Great Progress Is Also Seen In The Pelhams -- BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED IN PELHAM MANOR FOR 1925, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition, Pelham Page 1, cols. 1-8 & Pelham Page 2, cols. 1-2.  

"TREMENDOUS BUILDING BOOM EXPERIENCED IN PELHAM HGTS
-----

Although the village of Pelham Heights has become pretty well established, new homes are being constantly erected here, wherever there is an undeveloped plot.  In this village, there has been not rapid or 'mush-room' growth in late building development, but rather, Pelham has grown in a sensible, staple manner.  The village of Pelham is regarded as a section meant for residence only, and these residences re limited to better homes of the one-family type only.

Large apartments which are becoming a feature of almost every home community are zoned against in the residential sections of Pelham Heights.  Late building developments in Pelham have tended, as in North Pelham, Pelham Manor and other residential communities, toward a single-family structure, artistic in appearance and permanent in construction.  Some of the older residences have been constructed along more palatial lines, and even today, some of the newer homes are of a size and type indicative of wealth and stability.

During January alone, building permits representing more than $100,000 were issued by Building Inspector Harry B. Mulliken.  Most of the buildings in this group are to be erected by Frederick Jockell, whose investments will total $80,000, according to these permits.  These are among the newest developments in Pelham Heights, and consist of four 2 1/2 story dwellings to be erected in various parts of the village.

During this month and the last few days of January, however, no permits were issued for any other large developments in Pelham aside from permits for minor purposes.  Hence the amount of building during the early part of the year is not expected to be the same through every month of the year.  Building in the more developed parts of the village is bound to be sporadic and isolated, in view of the fact that Pelham Heights is pretty well built up.  

Other late developments include a group of small artists and attractive stucco homes on Ancon avenue, which add to the prestige of Pelham as a village of fine homes, 2 1/2 stories, bordering the new Hutchinson Parkway at Sparks avenue.  These were recently completed by the Twentieth Century Homes, Inc., this place being developed by Manning Stires as 'Manning Terrace.'  There are nine attractive homes in this group, a frame or stucco construction.

The construction of the Hutchinson Parkway through this section  will probably result in the construction of several more small homes at the end of the village, wherever there are undeveloped plots.

The future promises a great change along Wolf's lane, however.  The widening of this street has brought with it the forecast that Wolf's lane will one day be the main business center of this section, as a continuation of the business district along Fifth avenue in North Pelham.  An indication of what it promises to become is shown by the reconstruction of the old Orlando building by the John T. Brook company.  The remodeled building will be known as Pel Gables, and will be English in design, like Pelbrook Hall and Pelham apartments in North Pelham.  It will be a business and home building of an artistic type.  

The open ground along the westerly side of Wolf's lane will probably be open to business, rather than to residential development, and it is believed that within a few years, this part of Wolf's lane will see an unprecedented development along business lines, in continuation of the business places already established along this street near the New Haven station.

The largest single development in Pelham Heights during the coming year will be the new $290,000 school building to be erected on the present Colonial school will be one of the most modern in the town of Pelham, and will be in harmony with the residents in that section.  Starrett and Van Vleck architects, were last week commissioned to draw up plans and specifications for the new school, along Colonial lines of architecture.  Bids are to be advertised for this week to get a wrecking concern that will pay for taking down the present school building, and taking away the material in it."

Source:  TREMENDOUS BUILDING BOOM EXPERIENCED IN PELHAM HGTSThe Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Feb. 27, 1926, 1926 Realty and Building Edition, Pelham Page 2, cols. 1-8.

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