Historic Pelham

Presenting the rich history of Pelham, NY in Westchester County: current historical research, descriptions of how to research Pelham history online and genealogy discussions of Pelham families.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Edward C. Cooper Tried to Resurrect His Solar Salt Works on City Island in 1852 and 1853


One of the earliest commercial manufacturing enterprises constructed in the Town of Pelham was a small solar salt works built on City Island by Dr. Edward C. Cooper of 22nd Street in New York City during the early 1830's.  A print in the collection of the New York Historical Society entitled "E.C. Cooper's Plan of Salt Works at City Island (1835)" shows a remarkable facility with a windmill built atop a platform in Long Island Sound that pumped water via a pipe to a tank above four "inclined planes" down which salt water was dripped onto a bed of gravel covering the inclined plane surfaces at precisely the correct rate so that water would coat the gravel and the heavier salt-laden brine would flow downward into "rooms" (also known as "pans") at the bottom of the inclined planes.  There, a small and movable roof could be rolled over the pans during rain (and at night) and rolled away from the pans during sunlight.  Evaporation of the liquid in the thick brine would leave salt crystals that could be harvested for profit.



"E. C. Cooper's Plan of Salt Works at City Island (1835) From an old print
in the New York Historical Society" Source: Jenkins, Stephen, The Story of
The Bronx From The Purchase Made by the Dutch from the Indians in 1639
to the Present Day, Opposite p. 626 (G. P. Putnam's Sons New York and
London, The Knickerbocker Press, 1912).  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

I have written before about Cooper's solar salt works on City Island during the early 1830s.  See Mon., Sep. 01, 2014:  Solar Salt Manufacturing Plant Built on City Island in the Town of Pelham in the 1830's.  In that article I wrote that "Diligent effort has uncovered no primary sources that address when, how or why Cooper's salt works on City Island failed (if the works actually 'failed')."  I also wrote that "no record has yet been located to determine whether Edward C. Cooper ever sold stock to raise money for his plan to build a larger solar salt works.  At present, however, it does not appear that any such sale of stock took place."  It turns out, however, that additional research has revealed more to the story of Edward C. Cooper and his solar salt works on City Island in the Town of Pelham.

More than twenty years after his first effort to operate a solar salt manufacturing plant on City Island failed apparently due to lack of funds, Edward C. Cooper tried a second time.  In late 1852 he reportedly began construction of a new solar salt manufacturing plant, once again, on City Island.  From short descriptions of the second facility, it apparently was quite similar to the technology he patented and used to construct his first facility on City Island in the 1830s.  

According to one account, Cooper began construction of his second facility so late in the season in 1852 that it was "too late in the season to form salt."  Thus, according to the same account, he had to abandon the effort "for want of funds."  

It seems that, for a second time, Cooper had an idea and the desire to make it a reality, but lacked the necessary funds to succeed.  He did not give up, however.  Instead, he made a written appeal to the New York Chamber of Commerce in New York City asking for funds (its "patronage") to permit him to continue construction.  Cooper submitted with his written request for aid a "plan" of the salt works he had begun construction on City Island.  He estimated that $5,000 would enable him to construct ten acres, or more, of salt works, yielding upwards of 10,000 bushels of salt annually. 

The New York Chamber of Commerce considered Cooper's request at its regular monthly meeting on the afternoon of Tuesday, March 1, 1853.  After reviewing the communication, the organization ordered that it be placed "on file," effectively rejecting the request perfunctorily.

Once again, Cooper's grand plan to manufacture and operate a solar salt works on City Island in the Town of Pelham failed for lack of funds.  Cooper does not appear to have tried again.



Page 1, United States Patent X8,821 Issued to E.C. Cooper for an
"Evaporator" by the United States Patent Trademark Office on
May 16, 1835.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

*          *          *          *          *

"SALT FROM OCEAN WATER. -- At a meeting of the New York Chamber of Commerce, on Tuesday, a communication was received from Edward C. Cooper in relation to the manufacture of salt from ocean water.  The Journal of Commerce says: -- 

Accompanying it was a plan of salt works constructed last season on City Island, East River, but too late in the season to form salt, and abandoned for want of funds.  They are formed of inclined planes, made on the earth, of hydraulic cement, taking four barrels to every thousand feet of surface.  It is estimated that $5,000 would construct ten acres, or more, of works, yielding upwards of 10,000 bushels of salt annually.  The patronage of the Chamber is requested.  The communication was ordered to be placed on file."

Source:  SALT FROM OCEAN WATER, Daily Albany Argus [Albany, NY], Mar. 5, 1853, Vol. XXVIII, No. 8339, p. 2, col. 5.  

"CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
-----

The New York Chamber of Commerce held its regular monthly meeting yesterday afternoon, at the Merchants' Bank. . . .

A communication was received from EDWARD C. COOPER, in relation to manufacturing salt from ocean water.  Accompanying it was a plan of salt works constructed last season to form salt, and abandoned for want of funds.  They are formed of inclined planes, made on the earth, of hydraulic cement, taking four barrels to every thousand feet of surface.  It is estimated that $5,000 would construct ten acres, or more, of works, yielding upwards of 10,000 bushels of salt annually.  The patronage of the Chamber is requested.  The communication was ordered to be placed on file."

Source:  CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Morning Courier And New-York Enquirer [NY, NY], Mar. 2, 1853, Vol. XLVII, No. 8019, p. 3, col. 2.  

"SALT FROM SEA WATER. -- Edward C. Cooper has memorialized the New York Chamber of Commerce to aid him in the construction of works, already commenced by him, on City Island, East River, for the manufacture of salt from ocean water.  It is estimated that $5,000 would construct ten acres or more of works, yielding upwards of 10,000 bushels of salt annually."

Source:  SALT FROM SEA WATER, The Baltimore Sun, Mar. 4, 1853, Vol. XXXII, No. 92, p. 1, col. 3.

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.
Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.
Order a Copy of "Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Another Account of Naval Skirmish Off Pelham During the War of 1812


The War of 1812 was fought from June 18, 1812 to February 18, 1815 between the United States and the United Kingdom (as well as certain of the U.K.'s North American colonies and Native American allies).  Long Island Sound from Gardiners Island on the East to Hell Gate on the West was strategically important as a principal transportation waterway leading to New York City.  Thus it should come as no surprise that there were naval engagements, naval skirmishes, and captures of prizes in the waters off Pelham during 1813 and 1814. 

I have written before about Pelham and the War of 1812.  For examples, see

Bell, Blake A., The War of 1812 Reaches Westchester County, The Westchester Historian, Vol. 86, No. 2, pp. 36-47 (Spring 2012). 

Mon., Oct. 10, 2016:  More About British and American Naval Activities Off the Coast of Pelham During the War of 1812.

Mon., Mar. 30, 2009:  Orders Issued from Pelham During the War of 1812

Thu., Nov. 09, 2006:  Accounts of Two Witnesses to Skirmish That Occurred Off the Shores of New Rochelle and Pelham in the War of 1812

Fri., Jun. 16, 2006:  Period News Reports Shed Some Light on Pelham During the War of 1812.

Today's Historic Pelham article provides yet another account of British and American naval activities off the coast of Pelham during the War of 1812.  The account was published in the September 24, 1813 issue of The Advertiser, published in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.  

During early September, 1813, British naval vessels moved into Long Island Sound off the shores of Connecticut and New York's Westchester County.  Commodore Lewis already had assembled a small flotilla of about thirty small U.S. Navy gunboats stationed in New York City.  

Though America was at war with the British, the appearance of the British Navy in Long Island Sound was “unexpected."  See British Squadron in the Sound, New-York Spectator, Sep. 11, 1813, Vol. XV, No. 1618, p. 2, col. 2.  According to one newspaper account, for a distance of twenty miles along both sides of the Sound the militia “everywhere crouded [sic] to the shore to prevent the enemy from landing and to protect the exposed property of their fellow citizens."  Id.

On Monday, September 6, 1813, the British frigate Acasta, the sloop of war Atalanta and several “tenders” left anchorage in Gardiners Bay and moved westward in Long Island Sound toward New York City.  See Depredations in the Sound, N.Y. Herald, Sep. 11, 1813, Issue No. 1229, p. 3, col. 3.  The Panic-stricken crews of American vessels in their paths sailed for dear life, attempting to flee the naval vessels and avoid capture as war "prizes."  Among such ships were the many “coasters,” barges, and market boats that regularly traveled up and down Long Island Sound to supply New York City with butter, cheese, vegetables and more.  See id

Many of the little vessels were too slow to escape the British Navy.  The first to be captured was the packet Amazon under the command of Captain J. Conklin.  See Latest from the Enemy's Squadron, in the Sound, Voice of the Nation, Sep. 11, 1813, Vol. 1, No. 13, p. 3, col. 1.  Among the passengers on board were “several ladies, Mr. John Slesson, Mr. John Graham, a lieutenant in the U. States army, and Mr. Stephen Ketchum”.  See id.  A second ship escaped by heading to shallow waters near “Hog Island” (today’s Travers Island on the border between Pelham and New Rochelle).  See id.  At about sundown, the British captured five more sloops off Lloyd’s Neck”.  See id.  According to one account, the British “succeeded in capturing almost every sloop that was then out” including many of the coasters that supplied the City with butter, cheese and vegetables.  See Depredations in the Sound, supra.  According to the report, at one point British barges made it to City Island in the Town of Pelham and "were seen in possession of about 30 sail of vessels."  (See below.)

At the time, Pelham residents and other citizens who lived on both sides of Long Island Sound from New York City to Connecticut and even beyond were under arms, ready to meet a British invasion.  A company of flying artillery stationed in New York City was sent northeast to New Rochelle to help repel any such invasion.  

At about 8:00 a.m. on Thursday, September 9, the American flotilla approached the British ships in Long Island Sound.  According to one account, the American gunboats positioned themselves across the Sound stretching from Huckleberry Island (just off the shores of New Rochelle and Pelham) to Sands Point.  Wilson, George N., The Invasion of New Rochelle in 1813, The Westchester Historian, Vol. 40, No. 2, p. 27 (Apr. May Jun. 1964).  The same account notes:  

“Each gun boat carried a crew of thirty-six men.  On a carriage on the main deck, each carried one twenty pound long gun, and some of them also had a howitzer.  They were forty five feet long, usually rowed or towed, as they carried no sails.  One must realize that these gun boats were no match for the frigate or the sloop of war.  A frigate was the largest fighting ship afloat at that time; it was a three masted, fore and aft rigged vessel of broad beam, mounting forty-four guns on two decks.  The sloop of war was single masted fore and aft, of broad beam, mounting eighteen to thirty-two guns on one deck.”  Id., pp. 27-28. 

After the American ships maneuvered into position, a British sloop of war hoisted sails and approached Huckleberry Island.  Id., p. 28.  One of many naval skirmishes of the War of 1812 was about to begin, just off Pelham and New Rochelle shores. 

As the sloop sailed within range, the American gunboats opened fire.  A cannonade followed, with guns blasting and echoing across the shores of Pelham.  

Clearly the skirmish was minor in the scheme of things.  One newspaper account described the entire engagement as follows:  “our flotilla approached so near to one of the British vessels, as to exchange several shot with her.”  British Squadron in the Sound, supra.  However, according to the same account, the American ship that exchanged shots with the British was “unwilling to hazard a contest” and withdrew eastward. Id. A modern analysis of the engagement published in The Westchester Historian in 1964 described the skirmish as a “naval engagement” that consisted of a “cannonade going for a few hours.”  The Invasion of New Rochelle in 1813, supra.  Yet another account suggests that the engagement lasted about an hour.  See Lindsley, Charles E., Pelham [Chapter XVII] in History of Westchester County, New York, Including Morrisania, Kings Bridge, and West Farms, Which have Been Annexed to New York City, Vol. I, pp. 705-06 (Scharf, Thomas, ed., Philadelphia, PA: L. E. Preston & Co., 1886).

The newspaper account of the engagement published in The Advertiser and quoted in full below described the skirmish off the shores of Pelham as follows:

"the flotilla of gun boats, 30 in number, under Commodore Lewis, passed thro [sic] Hurl-gate [i.e., Hell Gate] on Thursday to Sand's Point where, after manoeuvering against a strong tide, they commenced firing at 2 and half miles distance.  A frigate supposed to be the Acasta then drew out with the apparent intention of bring the flotilla to close action; but which the gun boats were obliged to avoid, owing to the wind being too high to admit of fighting to advantage; and after exchanging 20 or 30 shots, the flotilla came to anchor, and the frigate joined her consorts.  The latest accounts of the enemy say that they have returned to the eastward."  (See below.)

While most in Pelham have heard of the Battle of Pelham on October 18, 1776 during the Revolutionary War, few have heard of the naval skirmish off the Shores of Pelham on September 9, 1813 during the War of 1812.  Pelham, it seems, long has been at the crossroads of history. . . . 



British Warship During War of 1812 Like Those that Prowled the 
Waters Off Pelham and New Rochelle. NOTE: Click on Image to Enlarge.

*          *          *          *          *

Below is another brief account of the skirmish off the shores of Pelham in 1813.  It is followed by a citation and link to its source.  

"NEW-YORK, Sept. 11.

We are sorry to announce, that two Frigates and a sloop of War have come down Sound within about 20 miles of this city, off Maroneck [i.e., Mamaroneck], and have made many prizes of coasting, wood and market boats.  Indeed it is said that their barges had been down to City Island about 16 miles from this city, and that on Tuesday they were seen in possession of about 30 sail of vessels, and that they had landed near Rye and taken off about 80 sheep.  The inhabitants from Haerlem to Stamford are under arms, and a company of flying artillery have gone from this city to New-Rochelle; also the flotilla of gun boats, 30 in number, under Commodore Lewis, passed thro [sic] Hurl-gate [i.e., Hell Gate] on Thursday to Sand's Point where, after manoeuvering against a strong tide, they commenced firing at 2 and half miles distance.  A frigate supposed to be the Acasta then drew out with the apparent intention of bring the flotilla to close action; but which the gun boats were obliged to avoid, owing to the wind being too high to admit of fighting to advantage; and after exchanging 20 or 30 shots, the flotilla came to anchor, and the frigate joined her consorts.  The latest accounts of the enemy say that they have returned to the eastward."

Source:  NEW-YORK, Sept. 11, The Advertiser [Wilkes-Barre, PA], Sep. 24, 1813 p. 3, col. 2 (Note:  Paid subscription required to access via this link).  

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.
Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.
Order a Copy of "Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak."

Labels: , , , , ,

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Pelham Post No. 50, American Legion, Had Option to Buy Pelhamdale in 1945


Only two pre-Revolutinary War structures remain standing in Pelham.  The first is the so-called Kemble House located at 145 Shore Road.  The wing on the left of the home (when seen from Shore Road) is the original part of the home built between about 1750 and 1760.  The other pre-Revolutionary War home is known as "Pelhamdale."  Located at 45 Iden Avenue, it is on the National Register of Historic Places.  The lower level of the home on what is now the rear of the structure is the original part of the home that also was built between about 1750 and 1760.  Today's Historic Pelham article describes efforts by Pelham Post 50, American Legion to purchase Pelhamdale for use as a clubhouse in 1945 and 1946.  

Rumors began to swirl in the little Town of Pelham in the spring of 1945 that the local American Legion post wanted to buy the home known as Pelhamdale on Iden Avenue.  The home was on the market after the death of W.W. Taylor.  It was for sale by his estate.

At the time, Pelhamdale was somewhat run-down.  Knowing that the structure was on the market, all of Pelham feared the historic home might be demolished and replaced with several smaller homes on the same property.  Pelham Post 50, American Legion stepped up to do its patriotic duty.  

On May 17, 1945, the Chairman of the post's Building Committee, Frederick C. Genz, announced to members of the post recommended that the post purchase Pelhamdale and remodel it for use as an American Legion clubhouse.  With so many young men of Pelham returning from the war (and expected to return from the war), members of the post felt that something patriotic should be done to support such returning veterans.  They wanted to provide them with a lovely clubhouse for entertainment and gathering purposes.  There even was talk about permitting its use as a USO canteen for a period of time.

It was as if the Pelham veterans had exploded a massive bomb in the midst of Town.  

Pelhamdale sat in a quiet residential enclave zoned only for single family residences.  Zoning ordinances would either have to be changed or a waiver would have to be provided by the Zoning Board of Appeals.  Within days nearby residents mobilized to do battle with Pelham Post 50.

A group of eighty nearby residents organized a protest against use of the historic home as a clubhouse.  A petition was circulated as part of the protest and the eighty residents signed it.  On Monday, June 18, 1945, Pelham Manor resident Percy J. Gaynor who lived on Carol Place near the historic home appeared before the Board of Trustees of the Village of Pelham Manor.  Representing the protesters, he presented the petition to the Board and demanded that the Board make no changes to the zoning laws that would allow any use of the structure other than as a private residence.  The Board demurred, saying that it had nothing before it related to the matter and that the issue would be addressed by the Zoning Board of Appeals rather than the Board.  Gaynor announced that his group immediately would file its petition with the Zoning Board of Appeals.

Pelham's battle-tested veterans appeared quickly to retreat.  In a matter of days, post Commander Daniel E. Brown told a reporter for The Pelham Sun that the post planned to abandon its plans to purchase Pelhamdale.  He said "Post 50 does not want to arouse antagonism in its plans."

Commander Brown's comments may have been a tactical feint.  It seems that the true reason for the comments may have been that the estate of W. W. Taylor had raised the price for the home by $20,000.  Commander Brown also told the reporter that the Building Committee was looking at three other possibilities:  (1) two floors in The Pelham Sun building at 89 Wolfs Lane; (2) a home on Pelhamdale Avenue; and (3) a home on Shore Road.

Far from abandoning their plans, for the next few months, members of Post 50 worked quietly behind the scenes to dampen opposition to those very plans.  First, the post acquired an option to purchase the property with an intent to use it for "patriotic purposes."  Next, the veterans met with owners of properties within 1,000 feet of the property (whose support would be required to obtain a zoning change or a variance).  The veterans provided nearby homeowners assurances that there would be no noise problems and that on street parking would be adequate.  

Neighbors would not be swayed.  Within days of the veterans' meetings with local landowners, an even bigger protest than the first one erupted.  This time, nearby homeowners prepared a petition signed by more than ninety of the 177 property owners who lived within 1,000 feet of the Pelhamdale property objecting to use of the home as a clubhouse and demanding that no change to, or variance from, the residential zoning ordinance be permitted.  The homeowners again appeared at a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Pelham Manor on Monday, December 17, 1945.  According to one report, the homeowners  "demanded that any request for a variation of the zoning restrictions with regard to the Pell House property at Carol Place and Iden Avenue be rejected, and that they be notified if and when application for a change be made."

The very next day, the Commander of Pelham Post 50, Daniel E. Brown, was defiant.  He told a local reporter that "Post 50 was going right ahead with its plans, that it possessed a contract of sale for the Pell House property and that when the proper time arrived a petition for a variant use of the Pell House would be presented and it would then have sufficient signatures to ensure its approval.  He indicated that he was optimistic about the result."

The protests, however, continued as nearby neighbors battled the plan.  Only one month later, the battle-weary veterans of Pelham Post 50 surrendered and raised the white flag.  On January 21, 1946, Commander Daniel E. Brown announced that the post had "abandoned its efforts to secure Pell House in Pelham Manor as a clubhouse and is seeking another place."

The nearby neighbors, however, could not let down their guard.  Pelham residents throughout the town still feared the historic home known as Pelhamdale would be demolished to make room for several new houses on the lot.  A subscription initiative was begun to raise funds to purchase Pelhamdale and make it a public library for the Town of Pelham.  The neighbors renewed their vigorous fight.  Eventually, however, the initiative "fell through from lack of public interest."

It took two more years to resolve the uncertainty over the future of Pelhamdale.  Finally, in August, 1948 local newspapers reported that the estate of W. W. Taylor had sold Pelhamdale to Joseph Boucher, 2534 Woodhull Avenue, the Bronx.  Boucher intended to preserve the structure as a private residence.

The historic home known as Pelhamdale located in Historic Pelham would live to see another day.



Pelhamdale

*          *          *          *          *

"14-Room Mansion To Become New Home Of Legion Post 50


PELHAM -- The long-cherished dream of a clubhouse for Pelham Post 50, American Legion, was brought nearer realization last night when the post instructed the building committee to complete arrangements for the purchase of a 14-room stone mansion, the Pell House, at Iden and Carol Avenues.

Frederick C. Genz, chairman of the Building Committee, last night gave a detailed description of the house and its advantages as a clubhouse following an inspection by the committee recently.  The house is one of the historic landmarks of Westchester, having been built before the Revolutionary War.

Plans for remodeling and decorating the mansion were discussed.  It was brought out that purchase of a clubhouse is particularly propitious at this time, when returning servicemen will wish to make use of its facilities.  The purchase is expected to be completed within the next few days.

Arrangements were furthered for a block party to take place Friday and Saturday, June 1 and 2, on Harmon Place, to raise money for the building fund.  It was pointed out that the block party will be held in the afternoon as well as the evening of Saturday, June 2.

Commander Daniel E. Brown presided."

Source:  14-Room Mansion To Become New Home Of Legion Post 50, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], May 18, 1945, p. 9, cols. 3-4.  

"Eighty Protest Proposal To Change 'Pell House' Site of Legion Post Club
-----

Percy J. Gaynor of Carol Place Pelham Manor headed a small delegation which presented a petition signed by 80 residents within the immediate neighborhood of the old Pell House to the Pelham Manor village trustees on Monday.  The signers registered objection to any contemplated change in the zoning laws to make the district one other than for private residences, as at present.

Mr. Gaynor said he had read in a daily newspaper that the negotiations for the purchase of the Pell House and its use as a clubhouse were in progress.  He made it clear that such use of the premises by any organization would change the character of the neighborhood from its present strictly residential character.

Mr. Gaynor asked the Board to receive the signed petition as an official recognition of the feelings of the residents in the vicinity of the Pell House.

Mayor C. Furnald Smith said that he understood that Pelham Post No. 50, American Legion, had thought of purchasing the Pell House and transforming it into a permanent headquarters for the war veterans, but nothing had yet come before the Board in its official capacity.  Any proposed change in the zoning of the district would have to go to the Zoning Board of Appeals.

Mayor Smith said that Daniel Brown, Commander of Pelham Post, had told him it was the plan of Pelham Post 50 to improve the physical surroundings of the building and that there would not be a bar in the club.

'From any angle, it would be an improvement,' said Mayor Smith.  'The Pell House has an historical background and value and this seems to be the only way it can be preserved.  If a formal appeal to change the zoning laws is made, there will be an opportunity to be heard afforded to those who do not approve of a change.'  He suggested that the petition be given to Matthew G. Ely, chairman of the zoning board of appeals.

Another member of the delegation said that he did not see how a club could do without a bar.  'When the boys come back we don't want them to go to a clubhouse where there are many restrictions.  They will not want to have good times and enjoy themselves.'

Before withdrawing, Mr. Gaynor asked whether it was true that zoning laws of the village could not be changed with reference to Pell House unless the consent of 60 per cent. of the property owners within 1,000 feet of the building were obtained.  Mayor Smith said he believed it was so.

The delegation promised to file its petition with Matthew G. Ely, chairman of the zoning board of appeals."

Source:  Eighty Protest Proposal To Change 'Pell House' Site of Legion Post Club, The Pelham Sun, Jun. 14, 1945, No. 9, Vol. 36, p. 1, cols. 4-5.  

"Legion Abandons Plan to Remodel Pell House for Club; New Site Is Sought
-----

After a week-end conference with several persons who had promised to give major financial support to the efforts of Pelham Post No. 50, American Legion to obtain a permanent home for its activities, Daniel E. Brown, commander of the Post, on Monday evening told a Pelham Sun reporter that the plan to remodel the Old Pell House on Carol Place, Pelham Manor, had been definitely abandoned.

'The opposition of eighty nearby residents indicates that it would be difficult to obtain a change in the zoning.  Post 50 does not want to arouse antagonism in its plans.  Furthermore we have received notice that the price of the building has been advanced to $20,000 and that is another and more important reason why it has been decided to discuss other indications for the purchase or erection of a Legion building.'

Commander Brown mentioned several prospective sites.  The building at 89 Wolf's Lane, now owned by The Pelham Sun Publishing Company, was mentioned.  On the two floors above the street there are at present thirty unoccupied rooms.  The property is opposite the Memorial Park on which is erected the Honor Roll.  At the rear of Wolf's Lane is a large parking spot owned by the village to which access could be obtained from the rear of the building.  The lack of outdoor area is a handicap that must be considered.  

Among other proposals is a Shore Road location and one on Pelhamdale Avenue, as well as a more favored plan to build an entirely new and modern building properly equipped for a club for war veterans.

Commander Brown expressed a wish that the Legion clubhouse might be erected and be free from debt when it is opened for use, rather than erect a building which would be encumbered with a mortgage.

The definite abandonment of the Pell House plan will settle the controversy which has arisen among residents near to the site of the proposed Legion club.  At the monthly meeting of Pelham Manor trustees last week a petition signed by eighty nearby residents was presented.  It protested against any change of zoning laws in that locality.  It would be necessary to obtain a variance in the zoning laws in order to use the Pell House for any purpose other than a private residence.  

Source:  Legion Abandons Plan to Remodel Pell House for Club; New Site Is Sought, The Pelham Sun, Jun. 21, 1945, Vol. 36, No. 10, p. 1, cols. 3-4.  


"VETERANS WORKING TO STOP OPPOSITION TO PELL HOUSE SITE
-----
Have Secured Option on Historic Premises on Carol Place and Iden Avenue; Will Use It as Patriotic Center, If Consent to Variance of Zoning Restrictions Can Be Obtained.
-----

With opposition diminishing, Pelham Post No. 50, American Legion, hopes that it may soon be able to announce that the acquisition of the historic Pell House and plans for its transformation into a headquarters for patriotic effort in the Pelhams, has been carried out and the title to the property secured.

When negotiations for the purchase of the building were first announced, there was opposition from owners of nearby properties who professed to see in the new use of the big stone house, the probability of large crowds gathering there, with dances and concerts, almost nightly and the usual late-at-night hub-bub.

Rumors were circulated that it was intended to provide a U.S.O. Center, with hotel accommodations for returning veterans and that the probability of a noisy centre in the midst of a residential neighborhood would destroy value of nearby properties, because of a large number of parked cars in the vicinity.  

Before asking the Board of Trustees of Pelham Manor to issue the necessary permits for alteration of the premises and a hearing on the proposed change of zoning restrictions, delegates from Pelham Post 50, American Legion have been interviewing owners of properties within 1,000 feet of the building, it being necessary to obtain approval from sixty per cent. of them before submitting the proposal for a zoning change to the village trustees.

The Legion Post 50 has an option that can be exercised based on securing approval to the contemplated use of it by the new occupant from the neighboring taxpayers.  

The Pell House was once the residence of John Pell, a member of the family which founded Pelham.  It was used by General Lord Howe in 1776 as his headquarters when he commanded a British invading force during the Battle of Pell's Neck.  Some parts of the original building remain.  The Legion intends to remodel its interior and provide large parking space within the grounds, which overlook the Hutchinson River Parkway at Iden avenue and Carol Place.  A janitor will be the only permanent resident.

While signing the Legion's petition, a resident of Manor Lane said:  'It was because of our men who fought so well, that we are able to enjoy our homes in this community.  We were not attacked.  We did not know what destruction war can bring about.  Because of this and in a sense of appreciation of their service, I am in favor of signing this as a mark of appreciation.  I hope they will appreciate this privilege."

Source:  VETERANS WORKING TO STOP OPPOSITION TO PELL HOUSE SITE -Have Secured Option on Historic Premises on Carol Place and Iden Avenue; Will Use It as Patriotic Center, If Consent to Variance of Zoning Restrictions Can Be Obtained, The Pelham Sun, Nov. 29, 1945, Vol. 36, No. 33, p. 1, cols. 1-2.  

"Protest Against Legion Plan to Invade Residential Area by Club at Pell House
-----
Proposed Remodeling of Historic Building Into Headquarters for Pelham Post No. 50, American Legion Brings Strong Objection from Neighboring Residents; Legionnaires Will Continue Plans for Acquiring Building and Seeking Approval from Required Majority of Neighborhood Property Owners.
-----

Armed with a petition purporting to bear the signatures of more than 90 of the 177 property owners within the zone of protest, a delegation of taxpayers appeared at the monthly meeting of the Village Trustees of Pelham Manor on Monday night and demanded that any request for a variation of the zoning restrictions with regard to the Pell House property at Carol Place and Iden Avenue be rejected, and that they be notified if and when application for a change be made.  To obtain sanction to the use of a building for other than residential purposes, the approval of two-thirds of the property owners within 1,000 feet from any part of the property must be obtained.

Pelham Post No. 50, American Legion has obtained a conditional sales agreement on the Pell House property and wish to use it as headquarters for Legion activities in the Pelhams.

To obtain the necessary signatures representatives of Pelham Post 50 have been interviewing property owners within the zone.

Donald Phillips of No. 479 Wolf's Lane, was spokesman for the delegation on Monday night.  He referred to the petition which was signed by taxpayers living adjacent to the Pell House property last summer when it first was rumored that the American Legion wishes to buy the property and transform it into a clubhouse.  When attempt was made to file the petition with the zoning board it was discovered that Post 50 had not made an application for a variance of zoning restrictions.  Now that the Legion activities have been resumed, and he had read in the Pelham Sun that Pelham Post 50 had obtained a contract for purchase of Pell House he wished to file the protest.

Mr. Phillips made himself clear that the delegation was protesting against the use of building for any other than residential purposes.  There was no objection to the Amerian Legion or to that organization having a clubhouse in the town somewhere else, but there was a feeling that the activities of any clubhouse in that location would be detrimental to the value of property and not serve the best interests of those living in the vicinity.  He claimed that the Board of Trustees of the Christian Science Churches had registered objection to the clubhouse which would be in the vicinity of the church.

Acting-Mayor Bieber told the delegation that the Zoning Board of Appeals had jurisdiction over such matters and whenever a change of zoning is requested due notice is given fifteen days before action is taken and zoning hearing takes place [illegible] But those interested may have an opportunity to be heard.

Village Clerk Clyde Howes - No petition for a variance at Pell House has been filed.

Mr. Phillips -- I would like a ruling on which part of the property the 1,000 foot ruling begins, the center or the boundary lines.

Village Clerk Howes -- It is 1,000 feet from any part of the property.

The Board instructed the Village Clerk to prepare a zoning map on which the boundary lines of the 1,000 foot area are clearly shown so that the eligibility of the signers of the petitions for and against the change may be determined.

Daniel Brown, Commander of Pelham Post 50, was not present at Monday night's meeting.  One Tuesday he told a Pelham Sun representative that Legion Post 50 was going right ahead with its plans, that it possessed a contract of sale for the Pell House property and that when the proper time arrived a petition for a variant use of the Pell House would be presented and it would then have sufficient signatures to ensure its approval.  He indicated that he was optimistic about the result."

Source:  Protest Against Legion Plan to Invade Residential Area by Club at Pell House, The Pelham Sun, Dec. 20, 1945, Vol. 36, No. 36, p. 1, cols. 7-8.

"No Action In Zoning Dispute
-----

Inquiry of Clyde Howes, village clerk of Pelham Manor, showed that no application for a variance of zoning laws has been yet filed by Pelham Post 50, American Legion, in order to obtain the use of the historic old Pell House as headquarters for the activities of the Legion post.  

Similar inactivity is reported in the case of the reopening of the service station of Burgess B. Field, on Washington avenue.  The owner is in Florida and further action will be delayed until his return."

Source:  No Action In Zoning Dispute, The Pelham Sun, Dec. 27, 1945, Vol. 36, No. 37, p. 1, col. 6.  

"Post 50 Seeking New Clubhouse

PELHAM -- Pelham Post 50, American Legion, has abandoned its efforts to secure Pell House in Pelham Manor as a clubhouse and is seeking another place, Commander Daniel E. Brown announced today.  The Post seeks a building which can be used as a clubhouse after renovation, but if this is unobtainable it will purchase property and erect a building, Mr. Brown said.

The post will send a boy to represent it at the Boys' State encampment to be held in June at Manlius Military Academy near Syracuse, N. Y.  The boy will be selected by the high school faculty."

Source:  Post 50 Seeking New Clubhouse, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Jan. 21, 1946, p. 5, col. 3.  

"Historic Old Pell House Sold, Built Before Revolutionary War

PELHAM MANOR -- Pell House, almost 200 years old and one of Westchester's historic landmarks, Carol Place and Iden Avenue, has been sold by the estate of W. W. Taylor to Joseph Boucher, 2534 Woodhull Avenue, the Bronx.

John K. Miller, Mount Vernon real estate broker, who handled the transaction, and who has been managing agent of the property for 16 years, said the new owner will occupy the house and plans extensive alterations.  The old stone house, which stands on a plot of an acre-and-a-half, has 13 rooms.

Dates From 1750

The house, the only pre-Revolutionary mansion still standing in Pelham Manor [incorrect], was erected around 1750-1760, according to Lockwood Barr, town historian.  Mr. Barr, in his book, 'Ancient Town of Pelham,' relates that the house originally was called Pelham Dale, from which Pelhamdale Avenue derives its name.  It was built by Philip Pell, II, grandson of the third Lord of the Manor of Pelham.

According to Mr. Barr, the house, on a small triangular tract bounded by Carol Place, Iden Avenue and the Hutchinson Parkway, is all that remains of the original large farm.  After the Revolution, Colonel David Pell, a son of Philip Pell II, lived in the old homestead until hs death in 1823.  His widow sold the tract to James Hay who named the place Pelham Dale.

In the North wall of the house is imbedded [sic] a large piece of red sandstone on which is cut in relief the coat-of-arms of the Hay family.

Sought as Historic Shrine

'Pelham Dale was one of the magnificent country estates of Westchester,' Mr. Barr writes 'It has passed through many ownerships; yet today, in spite of its use and abuse, it still is a fine example of the mansions of its day.  Numerous unsuccessful attempts have been made to interest some patriotic society in purchasing this old Pell place and restoring it as a historic museum for the Pelhams.'

Last year Pelham Post 50, American Legion, was considering buying the property for a clubhouse but Pelham Manor residents objected.  Last January a proposal by the Pelham Realty Board that the mansion be purchased by popular subscription as a town public library for a World War II memorial fell through from lack of public interest."

Source:  Historic Old Pell House Sold, Built Before Revolutionary War, The Daily Argus [Mount Vernon, NY], Aug. 4, 1948, p. 5, cols. 4-6.  

*          *          *          *          *

I have written about the lovely historic home known as "Pelhamdale" (and "Pelham Dale") on numerous occasions.  For a few of many examples, see:

Wed., Feb. 01, 2017:  Pelham Historic Marker Placed on Hutchinson River Parkway in 1927.

Wed., Nov. 30, 2016:  Article on the History of Pelhamdale Published in 1925 After Tragic Fire.

Thu., Nov. 03, 2016:  1860 Auction Offering Pelhamdale Lots from the Estate of James Hay.

Thu., Oct. 20, 2016:  Fears in 1934 and 1935 that the Historic Home Known as Pelhamdale Would Be Razed

Fri, May 13, 2016:  1851 Advertisement Offering Farm and Mansion Known as Pelhamdale for Lease.

Wed., Sep. 23, 2015:  Yet Another Tale of Buried Treasure in the Town of Pelham

Thu., Sep. 17, 2015:  An Account of the February 28, 1925 Fire at Pelhamdale, A Home on the National Register of Historic Places.

Fri., Sep. 04, 2015:  Sale of the Pre-Revolutionary War Home Known as Pelhamdale in 1948.

Tue., Sep. 09, 2014:  The October 18, 1927 Unveiling of the Historic Marker at Pelhamdale, the Historic Home at 45 Iden Avenue.

Tue., Jun. 24, 2014:  Story of Pelhamdale, the Old Stone House by the Bridge, Once Owned by David J. Pell.

Thu., Jan. 03, 2008:  Charges in 1808 Against Lieutenant-Colonel David J. Pell of Pelham that He "Indulges in Inebriety and Habitual Drunkeness." 

Mon., Oct 15, 2007:  Town Proclamation Recognizes Celebration of the 250th Anniversary of Pelhamdale at 45 Iden Avenue

Thu., Oct. 26, 2006:  Genealogical Data Regarding David Jones Pell of the Manor of Pelham, Revolutionary War Officer

Wed., Nov. 02, 2005:  Engraving by P.M. Pirnie Showing Pelhamdale in 1861

Thu., Oct. 13, 2005:  Two More Pelham Ghost Stories

Mon., Sep. 19, 2005:  The Long-Hidden Pastoral Mural Uncovered in Pelhamdale, a Pre-Revolutionary War Home

Mon., Apr. 11, 2005:  More From the William R. Montgomery Glass Negative Collection (includes photograph of fire at Pelhamdale on February 28, 1925)

Tue., Mar. 22, 2005:  The 1790 U.S. Census Information for the Township of Pelham.

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.
Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog
Order a Copy of "Thomas Pell and the Legend of the Pell Treaty Oak."

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Monday, May 22, 2017

Early Radio in Pelham: Pelham Firefighters and Business at Pelham Picture House Installed "Radiophone" in 1922


By the time of the Roaring Twenties, the medium of "wireless telegraphy" had evolved into the broadcast entertainment medium we know as radio.  Between about 1919 and the early 1920s, crystal radio sets were beginning to gain attention and the infant audio broadcasting industry was toddling along. Crude battery-powered radios came into use in the Town of Pelham. 

I have written of the earliest days of radio entertainment in the Town of Pelham on a couple of occasions.  See:

Thu., May 22, 2014:  The Earliest Days of Radio in the Town of Pelham.  

Wed., Jan. 22, 2014:  Pelham Becomes Enthralled with the New-Fangled Entertainment Medium of Radio.  

By early 1922, "a large part of the people of Pelham" had installed early, crude radio sets in their homes.  The Pelham Sun reported on April 7, 1922:  "Judging by the number of aerials [i.e., antennae] seen in the Pelhams, a large part of the people of this community are daily enjoying the concerts, speeches, etc., that are being broadcasted by the large number of radio phone broadcasting stations now in operation throughout the country."  (See full transcript of article below.)  It appears that as early as March 24, 1922, as many as seventy-five Pelham homes had installed radio sets with aerials.  (See below.)  

Not everyone wanted (or could afford) to install the rather complex radios of the day.  The equipment often included a range of necessities such as electric "storage batteries," a receiver, a power amplifier, an audio amplifying horn like those on old-fashioned phonographs, an aerial (antenna) typically installed on the roof of the home, and the wiring necessary to complete the system.  The more complex systems also could be difficult to operate optimally.  Consequently, local organizations and businesses began to make "radiophone" broadcasts available to their members, their customers, and their prospective customers.  

Thus, the Village of North Pelham firefighters were among the earliest adopters of the new medium of radio in the Town of Pelham.  In a meeting of the firefighters held on the evening of Monday, March 6, 1922, the firemen decided to authorize local radio dealer Scooler and Lynch to install a Magnavox "Radiophone outfit" in the firemen's hall at the North Pelham firehouse.  Scooler and Lynch was tasked with installing the radiophone and a connected aerial on the firehouse roof.

The local newspaper reported that "[w]hen the radiophone is installed, the firemen will be able to listen in on the concerts sent broadcast by the Westinghouse station at Newark.  Baseball scores will be received as the games are played.  Election returns, decisions of important sporting events, etc. will all be at the disposal of the firemen."  The planned work reportedly was expected to cost $350.00 (about $5,125 in today's dollars).

Scooler and Lynch was located at 513 Third Avenue in North Pelham in 1922.  According to its advertisements (see below), it sold and installed "Radio Apparatus and Radio Accessories of All Descriptions."  

The Magnavox Radiophone selected by the North Pelham firemen for purchase from, and installation by, Scooler and Lynch was a fascinating piece of equipment.  Its name was a combination of the concepts of radio and "wireless telephony" -- hence "Radiophone."  It consisted of a receiving set with a large amplifying horn like that of a phonograph attached to it.  Known as a "reproducer with the movable coil," there were at least two models:  (1) the R-2 with "very great amplifying power, yet requir[ing] only .6 of an ampere for the field" with an attached horn 18 inches in diameter; and (2) the smaller R-3 with slightly less amplifying power, requiring only one ampere field current from the filament batter, and sold with an attached horn 14 inches in diameter.  

Magnavox also sold the Model C "power amplifier," saying:  "The Magnavox Power Amplifiers insure getting the largest possible power input for your Magnavox Radio.  They can be used with any 'B' battery voltage the power tube may require for best amplification."

Advertisements for such Magnavox equipment even likened the technology to the well-known phonograph invented in the 19th century.  One example said:  "Attached to any commercial receiving set, the Magnavox Radio makes it possible for you to hear all that is in the air as if it were being played by your phonograph."  



1922 Magnavox Radio Advertisement from the August, 1922
Issue of Radio News, p. 293.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.



Detail from the Above Magnavox Radio Advertisement
Depicting a Family Listening to a Magnavox Radiophone
in 1922.  NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.

At about the same time North Pelham Firemen were deciding to install a Magnavox Radiophone in their firehouse, the new Pelham Picture House announced that it would offer special events in connection with movie presentations where ticket holders could listen to radio broadcasts via a Magnavox Radiophone installed courtesy of Jerry's Electrical Service Company.

It appears from at least one advertisement (see below) that Jerry's Electrical Service Company had some form of office space at the Pelham Picture House in 1922.  "Jerry's" competed with Scooler and Lynch in the sale and installation of radio equipment.  Jerry's installed a Magnavox Radiophone in the Pelham Picture House theater to receive radio broadcasts on the evenings of Friday, April 7 1922 and Saturday, April 8, 1922 before showings of the silent films "The Flower of the North" with Henry B. Walthall and Pauline Stark (Friday evening) and "The Night Horseman" with Tom Mix (Saturday evening).  Jerry's also offered "Radiophone Concerts on the Hour" in its business at the Picture House.

In early 1922, Pelham clearly was in the midst of a radio "craze."  A regular column entitled "Local Radio News" began appearing in The Pelham Sun reporting on local developments concerning radio installations and radio technology.  The newspaper also began reporting on significant upcoming radio broadcasts in which its readers might be interested.  The new medium of radio was taking root in the small Town of Pelham.  

*          *          *          *          *


March 10, 1922 Scooter and Lynch Advertisement.
Source:  Radiophones [Advertisement], The Pelham
Sun, Mar. 10, 1922, p. 7, col. 4.  NOTE:  Click on
Image to Enlarge.  Text Transcribed Immediately Below.

"Radiophones

Radiophone broadcasting stations are now in operation at important centers all over the country.

You can easily receive these interesting daily programs with any of the standard Radiophone Receiving Sets that we sell.  These sets will also be completely installed by us.

We specialize in Westinghouse, De Forest, Clapp Eastham, Tuska, Grebe and Radio Corporation of America Radio Apparatus.

Sets $15.00 and up

Don't take a chance on second hand radio apparatus.  Pay a few cents more and buy it new from a dealer.

SCOOLER & LYNCH

Radio Apparatus and Radio Accessories of All Descriptions

Telephones:  Pelham 4876, 1568-R
513 Third Ave. North Pelham
Go a Bit Off the Beaten Path For Better Values"



March 31, 1922 Scooler and Lynch Advertisement.
Source:  RADIO PHONES [Advertisement], The
Pelham Sun, Mar. 31, 1922, p. 3, col. 6.  NOTE:
Click on Image to Enlarge.  Text Transcribed
Immediately Below.

"RADIO PHONES
GET IN THE RADIO GAME NOW
We can supply you with Radio Phone Receiving Sets and Radio-Phone Accessories of all descriptions, including DeForest, Westinghouse, Radio Corporation, Etc.
GET IN TOUCH WITH US NOW
Radio Apparatus and Radio Accessories of All Descriptions
Complete Installations -- Aerials Rigged
SCOOLER and LYNCH
513 THIRD AVENUE, NORTH PELHAM, N. Y.
Phones:  Pelham 1568-R, 4576
We Are the Only EXPERIENCED RADIO DEALERS in The Pelhams"



May 5, 1922 Scooler & Lynch Advertisement.
Source:  RADIOPHONES [Advertisement],
The Pelham Sun, May 5, 1922, p. 6, col. 5.
NOTE:  Click on Image to Enlarge.  Text
Transcribed Immediately Below.

"RADIOPHONES
RADIO STORAGE BATTERIES
RADIO SETS
RADIO APPARATUS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
WE RECHARGE ANY MAKE AND ANY SIZE STORAGE BATTERY.  RADIO ACCESSORIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
SCOOLER & LYNCH
Pelham 1568-R, 457"



April 21, 1922 "JERRY'S" Advertisement.  Source:
APPARATUS? [Advertisement], The Pelham Sun,
Apr. 21, 1922, p. 11, cols. 4-6.  NOTE:  Click on
Image to Enlarge. Text Transcribed Immediately Below.

"WHY GO TO NEW YORK
-- for --
RADIO SETS AND APPARATUS?
Tell 'JERRY'S' Your Wants
Electric Service
Questions Answered and Sets Installed By Competent Radio Men
RADIOPHONE CONCERTS ON THE HOUR
PELHAM PICTURE HOUSE"

*          *          *          *         *

"Radiophone To Be Installed In North Pelham Firehouse
-----
Scooler and Lynch Will Place a Magnavox Instrument Which Will Enable Radio Concerts to Be Heard Any Place In Concert Hall of Firehouse -- Westinghouse Concerts Will Be a Feature.
-----

North Pelham firemen are nothing if not up to date.  At a meeting of the members of the fire companies last Monday it was decided to install a radiophone outfit of the very latest design.  The work of installing the new wonder phone will be carried out by Scooler and Lynch, the North Pelham radio firm.  Specifications call for a magnavox [sic] instrument which will amplify the sound so that whatever is being broadcast the phone will be loud enough to be heard all over the big hall.

When the radiophone is installed, the firemen will be able to listen in on the concerts sent broadcast by the Westinghouse station at Newark.  Baseball scores will be received as the games are played.  Election returns, decisions of important sporting events, etc. will all be at the disposal of the firemen.

Scooler and Lynch will install the aerial on the roof of the firehouse.  The entire outfit will cost in the neighborhood of $350.00 and the work will be carried out at once."

Source:  Radiophone To Be Installed In North Pelham Firehouse -- Scooler and Lynch Will Place a Magnavox Instrument Which Will Enable Radio Concerts to Be Heard Any Place In Concert Hall of Firehouse -- Westinghouse Concerts Will Be a Feature, The Pelham Sun, Mar. 10, 1922, Vol. 13, No. 2, p. 7, cols. 3-4.  

"Picture House Will Have Radiophone
-----

Manager Clint Woodward, of the Pelham Picture House, has arranged a special treat for the patrons of the Picture House tonight and Saturday night.  A radiophone will be installed for the two performances each evening.  Through a Magnavox loud speaking attachment the program broadcasted from the various stations in this section will be heard from every seat in the theatre.  The instrument will be installed through the courtesy of Jerry's Electrical Service Company.

The picture for the evening's program will be James Oliver Curwood's thrilling story of the Canadian Northwest, 'The Flower of the North,' with Henry B. Walthall and Pauline Stark, as the leading artists.  The stories from the pen of James Oliver Curwood have interested many readers, and they will be afforded a real opportunity of seeing the stories enacted through productions such as the 'Flower of the North.'

Tomorrow's feature will be Tom Mix in 'The Night Horseman,' a thrilling western drama, and Larry Semon in 'The Show.'  An interesting program of new weeklies and comedies will make up the rest of the bill."

Source:  Picture House Will Have Radiophone, The Pelham Sun, Apr. 7, 1922, p. 8, col. 4.  

"LOCAL RADIO NEWS
-----

The people of Pelham are becoming more interested in the Radiophone every day.  They read the programs in the papers and are realizing what pleasure can be had from getting first hand the latest news, sport news, weather reports, correct Eastern standard time, and to hear concerts in which world famous artists take part.

It is the opinion of many that radio is not the case [sic].  Anybody can operate is not the case.  [sic]  Anybody can operate the simpler sets which many companies are now putting on the market.  There are among the residents of the Pelhams about seventy-five persons who have radio outfits.  In the comparatively short time that radio has been public this is a good showing.  The novelty of having radio shows has become quite popular.

All of those who were lucky enough to hear Ed Wynn's radio production, of 'The Perfect Fool,' are anxiously waiting for the broadcast of another such sterling production.

Don't worry, there will be another soon."

Source:  LOCAL RADIO NEWS, The Pelham Sun, Mar. 24, 1922, p. 5, col. 3.  

"LOCAL RADIO NEWS
-----

Judging by the number of aerials seen in the Pelhams, a large part of the people of this community are daily enjoying the concerts, speeches, etc., that are being broadcasted by the large number of radio phone broadcasting stations now in operation throughout the country.  Those who have not heard a concert over the 'wireless' are yet to have the real treat of their lives.  On Sundays, church sermons and good choir music are broadcasted by several stations.  Throughout the week fine, thoroughly enjoyable concerts are broadcasted.

Don't think that you will be unable to operate a 'set.'  Anyone can operate some of the simple sets now on the market.  If you want to be kept up to date in baseball scores, etc., radio will do it for you as soon as the season begins."

Source:  LOCAL RADIO NEWS, The Pelham Sun, Apr. 7, 1922, p. 8, col. 4.  

"LOCAL RADIO NEWS
-----

Through this column we wish to help and encourage the amateur in radio.  Of course, the most help that we will be able to give, will be to the beginners in radio.  First of all, a radio amateur should be careful as to what kind of a set is purchased.  Many of the so-called radiophones, just brought out, since the radio 'craze' has been so widely adopted, are not as good as they might be ,nor as good as money can buy.  Find out what set is best adapted to the conditions of your home before you make a purchase.  Any questions of general interest to radio fans will be gladly answered through this column."

Source:  LOCAL RADIO NEWSThe Pelham Sun, May 5, 2017, p. 6, col. 5.  

Archive of the Historic Pelham Web Site.
Home Page of the Historic Pelham Blog.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,